Things to do under $5

It is spring and everything is beautiful and sunny and you just can’t wait to get outside. But, what can you do that doesn’t cost a great deal of money?I gotcha covered. Here is just a short list of things to do that are all under $5, so put the gas in your car or the stride in your step and get going.The Natural Science Center on Lawndale Drive is a wonderful place to go for at least a couple of hours. It features many exhibits and events, a planetarium and a zoo. The center even has a park with a lake and picnic area. This is all for the low, low, price of $3.50 per person. It is an extra dollar for the planetarium shows.If you like the movies but are tired of the high cost of evenings out, try matinees at local movie theaters. Among them, the Grande Movie Theatre located at the Friendly Shopping Center has low-price movies between the hours of 3:30 and 6 p.m. The cost of movie tickets during these show times is $4.50.Ok, so what about food? Well, most appetizers at restaurants are under $5. Who said you had to order a main course? They also have desserts in the same price range. And then there is always McDonald’s.Some other things you could do is buy a book, go to an art gallery, take a walk in the park, go to the mall — trust me there is no entry fee. Rent a movie. Get a cup of joe from Starbucks. There are plenty of things to do. Get out and enjoy the sun.

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Summer movies to see from the Dreamworks studios

Here are some movies that are coming to the theatersthis summer:”Shrek,” starring Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz and John Lithgow, is a fairy tale about an ogre who tries to save the princess and his home. This movie comes to theaters May 18.”Evolution” stars David Duchovny, Orlando Jones, Seann William Scott and Julianne Moore. Aliens want to dominate the earth, and these four are all that stand in the aliens’ way. This movie hits the big screen June 8. “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion,” coming Aug. 10, stars Dan Aykroyd, Helen Hunt, Brian Markinson, Charlize Theron and Woody Allen as an insurance investigator who finds he’s being taken over by the powers of the Jade Scorpion.

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Track teams head to Philly for the Penn Relays

N.C. A&T Men’s and Women’s track teams will compete in the 107th Running of the Penn Relays Carnival at Franklin Field in Philadelphia on April 26-April 28.Both teams will be entering their 4×1 and 4×2 relays teams. The women’s team will also be entering a triple jumper and long jumper. The men’s team will also be entering their 4×4 as well as an individual contestant. The event will be shown on television stations nationwide. Aggies who will compete are:Women’s 4×1: Jennifer Dashiell, Danielle Fowler, Kitania Blake and Sara Waters4x2: Brena Cooper, Sara Waters, Jennifer Dashiell and Danielle FowlerLong Jump: Samira Powell-GrayTriple Jump: Chrystal LeeMen’s 4×1 & 4×2: Titus Haygood, Gerald Wright, Montay Wilds and Tim Walls4x4: Charles Schoffner, Danny Campbell, John Twitty and Seneca RogersHigh Jump: Jermicheal Watts The Penn Relays Carnival is one of the world’s largest track and field competitions, with 19,679 entries representing 851 high schools, 271 colleges and universities, 38 states and eight foreign countries. Last year, the meet saw a three-day attendance record of 102, 193 fans. The fans come to see their favorite teams compete as well as many Olympic athletes such as Michael Johnson, Marion Jones, Maurice Green, Gail Devers and Carl Lewis.Full results of the Penn Relays will be available on its Web site: http://www.pennathletics.com/pennrelays/.

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Patterson lands internship with NCAA

Malveata Johnson is not the only one proving that there is life after Lady Aggie Basketball. Teammate Rekha Patterson will become an Educational Services intern for the National Collegant Athletic Association (NCAA).Patterson, public relations major, first learned about the opportunity through the NCAA website. She sent in her application and the selection committee wanted to take a closer look at her and interview her. In mid March, the committee made its decision and made Patterson one of the interns.Patterson is not resting on her laurels. She wants this internship to be a foundation for future endeavors. “I just hope this internship allows me to network with many other individuals in college athletics and help to propel my career in athletics,” Patterson said.During the season, Patterson was one of the elder stateswomen on the team, doing all of the intangibles for the Lady Aggies. When asked to elaborate on propelling her athletic career, Patterson has no problems adjusting to life without basketball. She looking towards being involved in sports behind the scenes. “I knew this was it for me,” Patterson replied, “I want to be involved in sports management.”Just like any job and internship, Patterson’s has its pros and cons. According to Patterson, the pro of the internship is the fact that she is getting the opportunity to work with the national office. The disadvantage, however, is one that Patterson is willing to take: she will not be able to go to graduate school. “It (the internship) is like a full time job. I want to put my efforts into that,” Patterson said.

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Who’s to blame for violence in our schools?

A few nights ago, I watched a special episode of 60 minutes. Ed Bradley retold the story of the massacre in a suburban Denver high school we all know as Columbine High School.I listened attentively as the horror was retold of the shooting rampage by two heavily armed young, white males who took the lives of 15 people, including themselves, and wounded 28 others. He described in full the day in which it occurred, the extent of the damage, and the intensity of the situation. Everyone was in shock and at a loss of what to do about two teenagers on a murderous rampage throughout a nice, well-to-do, white suburban high school. I grew ill at the thought of it and at the fact that people still, to this day, ask themselves who is at fault. Fingers are pointed and the blame is scattered. Then, as the finger continues to turn back, it points at the parents, the school system and all the others that knew of the killers and their motives, but refused to take them seriously. Of course, all of these people can easily be blamed, but the parents continue to be the root of the shooting epidemic that is sweeping the schools of this country.I am utterly shocked at the number of shootings that have occurred within the American school systems since this rude awakening began in a junior high algebra class in Moses Lake, Wash., Feb. 2, 1996, to perhaps the most devastating of them all, the murder of a first-grader in Mount Morris Township, Mich., Feb. 29, 2000.Who could possibly imagine the life of young Kayla Rolland, disrupted by the war-like sounds of a .32 caliber pistol pointed at her throat by a fellow classmate? As a result of a minor quarrel during the previous day, a child was taken from this earth at the hands of another child. What does one say to the family of a young girl who was fatally shot in the neck at what is believed to be one of the safest, most enriching places on earth? What does one say to the five classmates who witnessed the slaughter of one of their young friends, viewed in horror as she bled to death before their eyes? What can anyone say to the child accused? The murderer who has not began, and will probably never, understand the depth of his actions.It is a shame that we cannot send our children to school without thoughts of violence eating away at our minds. We have school systems with the power to enforce order and to stress the ideas of a violence-free environment, and yet we have children still managing to destroy one another, giving up the remainder of their lives to rob another youth of theirs. Parents first and foremost should be blamed. Astonishingly, many of them have the nerve to be shocked when they are blamed for the actions of their children. I cannot think of any instance in which a parent should not be responsible for the actions of their children because they are their primary teachers. Whatever happened to morals and values and instilling them into the minds and into the hearts of our children? Teaching them the difference between right and wrong, letting children know that certain actions have certain consequences, and that they should not for any reason take the life of another human being? It truly disgusts me when I think of all of the children who have died at the hands of other children. When will parents they need to become more aware of their children and their children’s lives? How many more innocent children have to die because some freshman has never had a friend, or some junior was called a fool and slapped in front of his peers? Parents should also teach their children of the value of self-love and the value of self-appreciation. Have we left these lessons to be taught by television and video games? Not once has there been an instance in which the child murdering their peers ever cared if they lived or died. They were on a mission to kill and as long at the mission was complete, they were satisfied. How many more unnecessary graves must be dug, unnecessary caskets must be closed, and unnecessary deaths must occur before we heal the painful scar in the hearts of many of our children. When I have children, I want them to enjoy life as I have enjoyed mine. I do not want to send them to school in bulletproof vests, wondering if they will every see their mommy again. It is not too late to make a change, and certainly not too late to save our children.

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Total You Tour’ visits campus

Continuing 60 years of service to healthy living, Tampax brings its campus initiative to A&T. Fitness guru Donna Richardson and activist Sister Souljah will be featured panelist in the 2001 Tampax Total You Tour. The events will take place from 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. in the Memorial Student Union. In what started in 1999 as an eight Historically Black College and University tour has grown into a 10 college tour. Now with sponsors like BET and Noxzema, Tampax will be offering health and motivational forums along with booths equipped with nail technicians and a rang of educational materials and products. In addition to health and beauty awareness females who participate in the massage therapy will be eligible for to win a Honey Magazine photo shoot.

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Aggie baseball has chance to regain first in MEAC

The Aggies baseball team had a chance to take over first place with a series sweep over the Bethune-Cookman Wildcats over the weekend. If they won two of three games, they’d be tied for first place.Instead, the Aggies dropped all three games as they fell 12-4, 11-8, and 5-1 in a weekend series. The losses drop the Aggies to 17-24 overall; 8-6 in the MEAC and into a second place tie. The Aggies have had many bright spots this year.Pitcher Travis Scott leads the MEAC with 71 strikeouts and leads the Aggies with a 6-5 record and 3.44 earned run average. He has also pitched a team high six complete games which also ranks second in the MEAC. Infielder Eric Jones has popped eight home runs for the Aggies this season. Sophomore outfielder Austin Love has also shined while batting .306, which ranks eighth in the MEAC, and leads the Aggies with 32 runs batted in.Remaining games include:April 25, at Elon CollegeApril 26, at High PointApril 28-29, at Western CarolinaMay 1, at UNCGMay 10-14, MEAC Tournament at Ormond Beach, Fla.

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Eye on crime

N.C. A&T University Police reported the following incidents April 9-17.

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Strategies help conquer the battle between you and allergies

Watery eyes, runny nose, itchy eyes and throat and uncontrollable sneezes — sound familiar? If so, you are one of the approximately 40 million people who suffer from allergies.Research from Health.msn.com has concluded “that allergies can affect a person’s quality of life including productivity and educational performance.”As junior Kitania Blake sits in a classroom in Crosby Hall, she says, “My throat and my eyes are itching so bad right now.” Before she can finish her sentence, she is interrupted by a sneeze from one of her classmates. This familiar scene occurs as spring blossoms, bringing forth pollen, and spring winds kick up dust that we have to confront as we walk across campus. The best evidence of the “dreadful pollen” is the yellow dirt-like substance found on every car on this campus — although experts say the large pollen grains shed by pine trees do not cause allergies, the yellow film reminds us of the invisible variety spreading in the air. Professionals recommend the first step in dealing with allergies is to visit an allergist, but we all know that it is not easy for a college student to make it to the doctor, better yet an allergy specialist. For those who do not suffer from chronic allergies, visiting a local pharmacy and speaking with the pharmacist about the best over-the-counter medicines may suffice. If you need to deal with chronic problems, an allergist will perform a series of tests to isolate what’s bothering you.At Lebauer Allergy & Asthma in Greensboro, after they take your medical history, they will perform allergy skin tests. The first is percutaneous, where they scratch your back with allergens and, depending on your reaction, may either give you another test or begin discussing treatments. The second test, intracutaeous, is where they make an injection under your skin to determine your allergies. Most doctors use a combination therapy of immunotherapy and prescription medicine. Injections contains a small amount of the substance to which you are allergic, so that you can build up a resistance. Injects usually are made over the span of three to five years, usually twice a week at first, then less often with larger doses as time goes by. The sneezing, itching and hives may begin to lessen after at least six months to a year. After about five years, many can stop taking the shots completely.A receptionist at Lebauer Allergy & Asthma, receives such injections. “This helps control the symptoms I usually get from allergies. I am able to work and enjoy the outdoors better because of the injections,” she said.Most people only begin to suffer with allergies when an excessive amount of pollen, dust or other air-borne pollutants reach in their nasal passages. When the sneezing, running nose and itching eyes and throat are too much to bear, there are some less expensive treatments. The local Eckerd pharmacy suggests over-the-counter remedies Chloro-trimentine, Benadryl, Tavist and Tylenol Allergy & Sinus, which range in price from $2.99 to $7.99. To help get through the pollen season, try keeping the car rinsed off, knocking off your shoes when you enter the house, covering your mouth when walking outside and buying an air filter. All can help control the amount of pollutants in your environment that can bring on allergy sinus. And watch the weather. When it’s cooler, the humidity is high, and rain is in the forecast the day should bring less discomfort in the form of sneezes, runny noses and itchy eyes.

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Kobe, Shaq: together forever?

Ahhh…finally the regular season has come down to very end with 16 teams ready to battle for the NBA title. The NBA playoffs begin soon and this year’s playoffs should be better than ever…at least in the western conference.Everyone knows to dethrone the defending champions, they’ll have to withstand the dynamic duo of the Lakers’, Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal. Since the regular season is over, that means that the Lakers are no longer “bored” and are ready to begin defending their title. Rumors have surfaced all season long about the turmoil between Kobe and Shaq. They say that Kobe wants to “ball hog” and take over the team. They also say that Shaq brags about himself being the best and also wants to “ball hog.” Well forget all the squawk talk. There is no doubt that these two men form the most dominating duo in the league, and they are arguably the best two players in the NBA. Kobe Bryant, 22, finished with his best season as a pro by averaging 28.5 points per game (4th in the NBA), 5.9 rebounds per game, 5.0 assists per game, 1.7 steals per game, and shot 85 percent from the free throw line. Sound like ball hogging numbers huh? Yeah, right.Shaquille O’Neal, 29, averaged 28.7 points per game (third in the NBA), 12.7 rebounds per game (second in the NBA), 2.76 blocks per game (third in the NBA), and led the league with a .572 field goal percentage. So how can two players with so much talent not mix like these two, you ask? Well, truth is Kobe and Shaq are getting along fine. The media is blowing this thing totally out of proportion. True, they have had their differences but who doesn’t go through differences. Theirs was just made public because they are champions and everyone seems to just throw darts at them. The defining moment may have come last Sunday against the Portland Trailblazers. Shaq received a long outlet pass which set up a two-on-one fast break. As Shaq dished the ball to Kobe, Kobe went up for the dunk but was fouled hard by Blazer center Sabonis. Shaq quickly rushed to Bryant’s rescue exchanging harsh words and bumps with Sabonis and the Blazers’ bench. The Lakers won the game 105-100 and the two stars were even together at game’s end, embracing each other. How could you forget last year’s Game Seven versus the Blazers, when Kobe and Shaq put aside all things to help rally from a 15-point fourth-quarter deficit to win. What about when Shaq fouled out of Game Four of last year’s finals against the Pacers. Kobe looked over and said “Don’t worry. I’ll get this one for us.” Kobe went on to score a critical eight points in overtime to lead the Lakers to the 120-118 win. There is really nothing wrong with these two players’ chemistry. They were just anxiously awaiting this time of year. Now the playoffs are here and it’s their time. A dynasty is just beginning to unfold in L.A.

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Scholar athletes honored

A&T’s scholar-athletes proved that the difficult balancing act between academics and athletics can be done. At the second annual Athletic Academic Luncheon, held April 17 in the Student Union Ballroom, student athletes were honored for their accomplishments.Receiving awards for highest grade point average (female) were Shayla Stevenson and Gina Rengazlia, members of the Lady Aggies volleyball team. Stevenson is a graphics communications major with a 3.963 GPA. Rengazlia is a psychology major, also sporting a 3.963 GPA. King, a member of the football team, is an electrical engineering major with a 3.820 GPA.The following athletes carried a 4.0 GPA through the fall semester:Lucinda Bost – Softball Chrystal Lee – TrackGina Renzaglia – Volleyball Anthony Nobles – FootballMarsay Winder – Football April Lemons – SoftballShayla Stevenson – VolleyballChrystal Lee- TrackAnthony Nobles – FootballApril Lemons – Softball

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Antigone’ makes the stage: Review

The Richard B. Harrison Players have done it again. Congratulations to Frankie Day Greenlee for directing the intense production of “Antigone.”Suz Latham did a splendid job on the costumes for this classic Greek drama. Lots of browns, purples and golds lit up the stage. All of the members wore sandals along with their costumes.The play starts off with Antigone (Billicia Hines) talking to her sister Imene (Melva Clivens). Antigone is telling her that she is going to bury both of her dead brothers, whether they were considered dishonorable in life or not. However, King Creon does not feel the same way. He thinks that only the honorable brother should be buried, and that whomever buried both of them should be punished for going against his will. The Sentry, played by Eric McBroom, is forced to bring the person responsible for their burials to Creon. If he does not obey this order he shall suffer the consequences as well. McBroom played a comical coward by snitching on Antigone to save his own life. Hines was a dominant force by this part in the play. She stood strong and admitted to defying Creon because she felt that it was up to the gods to make decisions about death and not him. Clivens was great at playing Imene. She had the audience feeling the love between the sisters, especially if she was willing to die with her. Creon’s son Haemon, played by David Watkins, seemed to have a mind of his own despite his father. He warned Creon not to kill them or else he would die along with them and never return. Not only did Creon’s son tell him not to kill the sisters, but a blind prophet warned him as well. Creon remained stubborn and therefore suffered the consequences. The messenger came and brought the news to Creon that his son and his wife were both deceased. I thought that this scene was produced really well. While the messenger told the story, a shadow at the top of the ceiling re-enacted the whole death scene that he was describing. That scene was my personal favorite. “The set was really well made. The direction and the chorus was well coordinated,” commented Vanisha Hasan, a senior from UNC.The play ended with Creon mourning Haemon and his wife and feeling sorry for what he had done. “Antigone” runs through April 23 in the Paul Robeson Theater.

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