Flag football draws its won crowd

By Cornelius GaryRegister ContributorIt’s around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and a large crowd is gathering around the Holland Bowl. The Quik Sans have just won an exciting game against Showtime and the crowd is waiting to see more competition. The clash between the Headcrackers and Armageddon begins. Shortly thereafter, the Headcrackers complete a pass on Armageddon and the crowd gets noisy. Passersby hear all the commotion and rush to get in on the action. This is flag football, one of the 13 intramural sporting activities. Others include men’s and women’s basketball, soccer, softball, swimming, weightlifting, kickball, walking, volleyball, tennis, racquetball, wrestling, horseshoes and open gym (basketball). Intramural sports play an important part in the interaction and bonding of students on the campus of N.C. A&T. Intramural sports provide students, faculty, and staff access to recreation facilities and the opportunity to participate in recreation and sports programs regardless of skill level.“Playing intramural football at N.C. A&T has given me the opportunity to showcase my skills as a football player and to meet other students who feel the way I do about sports,” said Antwan Burk, an electrical engineering student from Wilson, N.C. This is Burk’s first year playing intramural sports.Carl Baker, the director of the intramural sports program, describes the goals and objectives of the program are:- To provide safe and appropriate facilities for all participants.- To provide a variety of recreational and sports programs that contribute to the personal, social, and physical development of students and staff members and- To increase awareness of programs and services available through Intramural Sports. Games are played Monday through Friday starting at 5 p.m. and ending at 7:30 p.m. To find out more about intramural sports at A&T, log on to www.ncat.edu/intmural/ or go by the office located at room 108, Memorial Union.

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Greensboro doing discovery hunt

The Future Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, in conjunction with Open Your Eyes Foundation and Action Greensboro, are collaborating to stage the first annual “Greensboro Discovery Hunt.”This fun-filled event will take place on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2001 beginning at 4 p.m. and ends at the Weatherspoon Art Gallery with a celebratory bash later that same evening.The theme for this inaugural event is “Mission Possible.” The purpose of this interactive team-based event is to educate young people about the assets of Greensboro with an emphasis on downtown through the use of maps and clues. This event is unique because of the commitment of young people to actively engage themselves and others in building spirit and pride in our community by:• Educating citizens through celebrating Greensboro’s existing assets/strengths• Encouraging interaction among diverse groups and participants• Demonstrating cooperative spirit among sponsoring civic organizations and volunteersRegistration will occur prior to 4 p.m. at the Kress Terrace lobby at 212 S. Elm St. Each participant will be on a team of five to six “agents.” The teams will be given set of clues and will have to travel Greensboro’s streets, with a concentration on downtown, looking for answers to the clues. For more information call 275-3794.

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Aggies show no smiles for Smiley

By Tarah S. HollandEntertainment Editor Rickey Smiley was a no-show at the Homecoming ’01 comedy show Oct. 9 but a sold-out crowd at Corbett Sports Center welcomed comedians Bruce Bruce, Montana Taylor and Charlotte native Tone X.According to secretary of the Student Government Association, Mia Ross, “Rickey Smiley had a family emergency the night of the comedy show and was unable to attend.”SGA Vice President of External Affairs Chester Williams could not be reached for further comment.Although Smiley was the show’s headliner, his absence didn’t hinder the outcome of the show.With Bruce Bruce stepping up to the spotlight and renamed headliner, many students felt that it was the right way to go.”I was upset because I was looking forward to seeing him [Smiley] along with the other guests, but without him I knew that they were going to fill time with a local talent,” said junior physical education major Anne Bondon. “Bruce Bruce made up for him not being there and he made the show funny. I’m looking forward to future shows.”Some Aggies took Smiley’s absence as a disappointment, like Chris Anderson, a sophomore chemical engineering major. “I felt disappointed and let down. Rickey Smiley was the main reason why a lot of people wanted to go to the comedy show. Yes [I feel] it affects the people’s opinions about him if he comes back another time. I doubt people will get their hopes up and may not show up.”Many long-time fans were more forgiving of Smiley and continued to show support.”I thought it was normal for Rickey not to show up. It was my first time attending and I like Bruce Bruce. That was enough for me,” said Aja Nelson, freshman elementary education major.Overall the positive, humorous mood of the comedy show was kept alive by the majority of students and performers.”I had a good time. The students were lively. The students also showed me love so I really had a good time,” said Montana Taylor. This year’s comedy show, which was shorter in running time than past years, was hosted by 102 JAMZ radio personalities Busta Brown and Amos Quick.

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A&T awarded for excellence in environmental academics

N.C. A&T has received the 2001 Excellence in Diversity and Environmental Stewardship Award from the Environmental Careers Organization in the academic institution category.Selection was based on the university’s outstanding leadership in academic programming, demonstrated commitment to preparing students of color for careers in the environmental field, long standing relationship with ECO and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and overall excellence.ECO is a 29-year-old national, non- profit educational, training and leadership development organization dedicated to building leadership capacity in the environmental field. Its flagship initiative is a national internship program that places hundreds of students and graduates annually at leading companies, agencies and nonprofits across the country.Eleven years ago, ECO launched The Diversity Initiative, which was developed to address the under representation of people of color working in the environmental field. Since that time over 1,500 aspiring environmental professionals of color from across the nation have been exposed to environmental career opportunities.The goal of the Interdisciplinary Waste Management Institute (WMI) at N.C. A&T is to create a talented pool of students who will become leaders in environmental fields. The WMI offers a certificate program in waste management that complements the undergraduate and graduate degrees. For more information, contact Dr. Godfrey Uzochukwu, director of the Waste Management Institute, at (336) 334-7030 or uzo@ncat.edu.

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Greek step out in full force during Homecoming

Tamika HudsonRegister Contributor”Ready or Not,” the N.C. A&T Greeks stepped out in full force. As a part of A&T’s Homecoming events, this year’s Greek Step Show was held for the first time at the Greensboro Coliseum on Friday, Oct. 12.Stepping out on the stage were three fraternities and three sororities on campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Psi, Phi Beta Sigma and Zeta Phi Beta. The crowd also enjoyed performances from the UNCG women of Sigma Gamma Rho sorority and the Dudley High School male step team.Sponsored by A&T’s Student Government Association and the Diamond Life Concert, this year’s events were a crowd-pleaser, exceeding last year’s mega performances with more acts and more space. The question stood throughout the show, who would top last year’s winners? Delta Sigma Theta won the 2000 ladies’ division, while the men of Alpha Phi Alpha took home the gold for the men.So who took home the gold this year? Well, it was all in the family, Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity won first place in the male division sliding down the soul train line, while their sisters Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority scored winning points shooting threes on the AKA basketball court. Placing second were the men of Phi Beta Sigma and a tie between the ladies of Delta Sigma Theta and Zeta Phi Beta. Coming in third were the men of Kappa Alpha Psi.A lot of preparation went into this much-anticipated event. Each group was allowed 15 minutes to perform, with a panel of judges choosing the best act. Phi Beta Sigma member Bryant Suitte commented that their step team started preparing for Homecoming a month in advance. Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority began preparation shortly after the Aggie/Eagle Football Classic. For many sororities and fraternities, practices ranged from 10 to 40 hours per week.With the extra space provided by the Coliseum site, creativity shined throughout. The Delta Cowgirls galloped their way on stage as the “Most Wanted,” as the Zetas asked their giant crystal ball what the future had in store, while the AKAs bounced on staged dressed in full ready to sign with the WNBA. For the males, the Alphas took the crowd back in time to the 1970s and turned off the lights while stepping to Barry White. The Sigmas were ready for war, dressed in American flag and Army gear, preaching peace. The Kappas made their grand entrance riding a motorcycle on stage. Unfortunately, the mission was impossible for the double-oh mistake the Kappas faced through technical difficulties, which hindered them from finishing their act.

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Drug Awareness week gets under way

Drug and Alcohol Prevention Week will be observed at N.C. A&T Oct. 22-26. The event is being sponsored by the Sebastian Health Center and co-sponsored by A&T’s University Police and Counseling Services.Activities will include:Monday – a wrecked car display, an educational blitz and Red Ribbon DayTuesday – a DWI demonstrationWednesday – Movie Night, 7 p.m. (Memorial Student Union)Thursday – Operation Aggie DWI Check PointFriday – Aggie T-Shirt DayFor additional information, Call Janet Lattimore at 334-7880.

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Hicks breaks NCAA rushing record

By Chris WallaceRegister Sports EditorAggie senior tailback Maurice Hicks is used to setting records, but on Oct. 6, against the Bears of Morgan State, Hicks set an NCAA mark as he rushed for 437 yards in the 52-42 loss to the Bears. Hicks, a native of Emporia, Va., accumulated 206 yards by halftime and 437 through the midway point of the fourth quarter until a bruised hip and exhaustion kept him from piling on more yardage. “It’s an honor to be in position to break a record,” said Hicks. “The credit goes to the guys doing all the blocking; the line, the fullback and receivers; they’re the ones who made it happen.” Hicks’ memorable night began early as he took a pitch and dashed 79 yards for a touchdown. After the Morgan State and Florida A&M games, Hicks stands only 400 yards from breaking the all-time A&T record set by James White (1990-1993) and is on pace to finish just under 2,000 yards rushing in 2001. Hicks will also participate in the Hula Bowl All-Star Classic in February.

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Lowly bears stun Aggies

By Chris WallaceRegister Sports EditorBALTIMORE, Md. – On a day when everything was supposed to be there for the Aggies, it wasn’t. The upstart Bears of Morgan State did the unthinkable as they upset the Aggies of N.C. A&T by a score of 52-42 on Oct. 6. The Bears, who had not won a MEAC game in nearly three years, used mainly a no-huddle spread offense as quarterback Lejominic Washington completed 30 of 45 passes for 551 yards and four touchdowns. He also ran for three more touchdowns, keeping the Aggies nationally rated defense on their heels all night long. “Deep down inside, our coaches and players are angry about losing 52-42 to Morgan State,” said Aggie Head Coach Bill Hayes. Despite the big day by Washington, Hicks’ superior performance overshadowed the entire game. Hicks, a senior tailback for the Aggies, rushed for an NCAA record 437 yards on 34 carries to break the mark set by TCU’s Ladainian Tomlinson a season ago. Hicks, fighting exhaustion, set the mark midway through the fourth quarter, but with the game on the line and the Aggies trailing 46-42, Hicks could only watch from the sidelines as he sustained a bruised hip and suffered from exhaustion. “Maurice Hicks is amazing,” said Hayes. “He’s a great football player who gives you more than 100 percent. Near the end of the game, he just couldn’t go anymore.” The Aggies seemingly had the game in hand after they took a 35-21 lead on a 98-yard interception return for a touchdown by cornerback Curtis Deloatch, but Morgan State stormed back with scores of their own on the ensuing two possessions. In the fourth quarter, Morgan State’s Washington scored on two short touchdown runs to complete the upset and give the Bears their first win of the season as well as their first MEAC victory in nearly three years. Bear receivers T.J. Stallings and Marc Lester did most of the offensive damage along with quarterback Washington as they combined for 19 receptions for 326 yards and two touchdowns. At the half, Hicks had already accumulated 206 yards and the Aggies seemed to gain control of the game.“Had I been able to stay in the game, there’s no telling how things might have turned out,” said Hicks. “Looking back on it now, I can say I’m proud of what happened, but at the same time, it was a hard loss for us, so we have to put this behind us.”

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College students not flocking to ROTC.

Wilvena McdowellRegister ContributorAmerica is at war and students are showing their support for the country by wearing the red-white-and-blue colors, but is the patriotic spirit leading them to enlist in the military?According to the ROTC programs at the college level in the Triad, the Air Force and Army ROTC programs at A&T have not seen increased interest from college students.The ROTC programs on A&T’s campus, located in Campbell Hall, is responsible for training 117 cadets combined from UNCG, Elon, High Point University, Bennett and Guilford colleges. None has reported any increase in students joining the service or enrolling in the programs due to the terrorist attacks. Any enrollments in the programs have come from recruiters going to the schools to persuade students to join ROTC. However, high school students are rushing to meeting the deadlines for recruitment on campus. Goldbar Recruiter 2nd Lt. Kim Green, a 2001 ROTC graduate from A&T, says high school students are showing more enthusiasm than college students.”I have not seen any increased interest from the students [college]. Interest in ROTC programs increased during this time of year from high school students who call us regarding our scholarships for the program,” she said. However, enrolling in the ROTC class does not necessarily mean a student is enlisted in the military. The junior and senior ROTC programs require that students join the services after two years in college.Though slow throughout the Triad, students interest in ROTC seems to be popular in the nation.According to www.thedepot.com, headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, near Montgomery, Ala., enrollment in the senior Air Force ROTC program at colleges nationwide are skyrocketing. Since the attacks, the number of scholarship applications have reached an all-time high of 3,000 compared to the usual 300 to 400.So why are A&T students shying away from the military and its college recruitment programs? One junior, Elton Spruill, says he loves his country but many students are afraid what might happen if the war becomes worse.”The fear of going to war and not coming back home, is a reason why [students] are not joining the military or enrolling in ROTC. I love my country…we have enough people to fight for our country,” he said.However according to Army Lt. Col. Larry Burnette, cadets in the ROTC programs are protected from going to war because education comes first. Students on campus who are active reserves that are not in the program don’t have that protection.”ROTC protects active students from being deployed to war. If a regular reserve or draft, the ROTC does not protect them,” he said. Burnette, who oversees all 117 cadets from surrounding schools, would write a letter to his chain of command to stop any ROTC cadet from going to war if they are still in school. Serving under contract, Burnette says the cadet’s first obligation is education.Not only is A&T’s ROTC now the hot topic at lunch time due to Sept. 11, but also the history of famous five-star generals that came from this campus. During Founder’s Day, cadets, students and faculty were embraced with A&T’s history as Maj. Gen. Hawthorne Proctor, keynote speaker and 1968 A&T graduate, gave an empowering speech. Until now, the ROTC department has stood off to the side as a silent building on campus. With war going on in Afghanistan, this silent building has emerged not only as A&T’s symbol of American pride, but as a symbol of rich African American history.

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Sojurner Truth play kicks off this year’s Lyceum Series

A powerful drama documenting the life of SojournerTruth will open the 2001-2002 N.C. A&T UniversityLyceum Series. “Truth,” featuring Rasheryl McCreary, will bepresented at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, in HarrisonAuditorium. The play opens when she is 70, lookingback on her life. She walked thousands of miles,searching for identity in a country ripped apart bythe Civil War, on a journey that took her from herbirth as a slave to a meeting with President AbrahamLincoln. The play was written by Eric Coble, is directed byRandy Rollison and features Bill Ransom on percussion.The series continues Sunday, Nov. 4, when Monroe KentIII appears in the role of Nat King Cole in“Unforgettable,” a presentation of the singer’s lifeand music. Other programs set for the academic year: Nov. 14 – Haitian artist Maude Pierre-Charles,Memorial Union Ballroom. February 2002 – The E. Gwynn Dancers of N.C. A&T. Feb. 21 – “The Meeting,” a drama imagining aclandestine meeting between Martin Luther King Jr. andMalcolm X, Robeson Theatre. March 9 – The Marion Anderson String Quartet,Harrison Auditorium. March 22 – “Catch a Rising Star,” the N.C. A&T SpringStudent Art Exhibit, Dudley Art Gallery. April 11 – David Burgess, guitarist, performs “500Years of Spanish Music in the Americas,” MemorialUnion Ballroom. April 2002 – The N.C. A&T Symphonic Band. All Lyceum events are free of charge to all A&Tstudents, the university community and general publicexcept for “The Meeting.” For more information, call 256-0863.

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Barber brings more than style to his cuts

By Thomas Vinson Register ContributorImmediately when you walk into Motivations II Barbershop, 1314 D Lees Chapel Road, you smell Clubman talc.You hear a host of people laughing and joking and old school R&B music playing, automatically making you feel like you’re at home and among family.Chairs are lined up on the right side of the wall and there are mirrors everywhere. You look all the way down on your left, first chair, and you see Timothy E. Morehead, known to everyone as Rex. A clean-cut man about 5’11,” 150 pounds, he is smiling and joking with fellow barber Darrell Wilkerson. “He runs his barbershop like a Fortune 500 company,” said Shamone Michael, a barber who has worked for him for a year.Morehead, 32, is the also the owner of Motivations I at 1459 East Cone Blvd., and Motivations III at 2308 E. Bessemer St.Even though his father was not a licensed barber, Morehead was inspired to cut hair because his father cut his and his brother’s hair. Morehead started cutting hair in the backyard at the age of 15, while he was still a student at Dudley High School. He enrolled at N.C. A&T in 1991 as an accounting major while continuing to cut hair on campus. “I was good with numbers, that’s where I got the urge for business,” said Morehead. He stopped going to school after a year and a half, to pursue his goal of being a barber. “If he gets his mind set on something he takes it to the next level,” said Reginald Scales, who has known Morehead for nine years and also has been cutting in Motivations for two years Morehead had his first barbershop at the age of 26, his second at 29, his third at the age of 32. “I could have easily name my shop Morehead’s Barbershop, but Motivation was a powerful word,” said Morehead. “You have to have purpose and motivation to do anything,” He said the key to his success was God and his wife, Sheryl. “Communication with my wife is key,” said Morehead. They have two boys, Jerrod, 8, and Jamal who is 18 months, and two girls, Jaime, 2, and Jalyon who is 4 years old. “A lot of people say there is a cost for success, and there is,” said Morehead. Morehead said family is first; it is important to have time with your family. The lack of time, long hours and being stationary are some of Morehead’s dislikes about running a business. “I like meeting new people, and the flexibility of the schedule,” said Morehead. “He has a good relationship with his employees,” said Doug Evans, who has been working for Morehead for three years.Prices in Motivations range from $9 for a regular haircut, edge-ups are $5, women’s eyebrow arches are also $5 — and motivation is “free.”Morehead’s tips for starting a business are-Listen to your employees-Value the difference of other people-Have patience and perseverance”If you go to McDonald’s and order a Value Meal and you tell yourself that you will not eat your fries until you get home, and you eat the fries, you don’t need a business,” said Morehead.In addition to the three shops, Morehead plans to open a chain of barbershops in every city and state. “I want a barbershop in every city and state just like Martin Luther King Street,” said Morehead. “I believe I can change the world cutting hair.”

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