Students wary of anthrax?

By Wilvena T. McDowellRegister Contributor”I am shocked and afraid of the effects,” said junior, Shane Reaves reacting to the news of anthrax in America. That is how majority of the students on campus are responding, yet concerns about anthrax has not been a pressing issue for the students.With recent anthrax cases targeting government and media facilities, many students are not worried about an outbreak on N.C.A&T’s campus. Yet that did not stop anthrax from hitting the campus in 1931.According to reports from the veterinarian division of the State Department at Agricultural and Consumer Services, the anthrax outbreak of 1931 on A&T’s farm killed three cows and nine hogs. Animals on the farm had to be quarantined to stop the spread. Only one human case was reported, of a veterinarian who became ill after drinking milk from an infected cow. But with human cases popping up in America, health official want to get the word out on safety measures. Guilford County Public Health program manager, Pat Sappenfield says students living in dorms should be aware of ways to prevent any spread of infections.”Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands,” she said. “I think people tend to forget that is the effective way of preventing communicable diseases,” she said. Sappenfield also informs that there are two ways to get anthrax: inhalation anthrax, when a person breaths in the spores, and cutaneous anthrax.The Sebastian Health Center on campus warns about cutaneous anthrax, which is passed by direct skin contact with spores.Barbara Gravely, the university physician, said flu shots will help doctors focus in on possible anthrax on campus.Since anthrax symptoms resembles the flu, the Health Center encourages students to get flu shots, which will be on Nov. 6, in Murphy Hall, Room 111.”If you’ve had a flu shot you won’t get the flu, and it makes it easier to spot out anthrax,” she said.Gravely wants students to be aware of anthrax.Symptoms of inhalation anthrax may resemble flu-like symptoms. Skin contact to anthrax includes a rash in the area touched. If students notice any of these symptoms they are to contact the Sebastian Health Center immediately.With government facilities like the U.S. State Department and the Supreme Court being targeted through the mail system, many people are nervous about checking their mailboxes.A&T’s mail center has taken on a new responsibility of protecting students. “We’re going to check everything before we deliver it to the students,” said Charles Carter, who supervises the center.

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Q & A

An outbreak of anthrax has many Americans asking questions about the disease that has taken the lives of four and threatened the lives of millions.Q: What is anthrax?A: Anthrax is an infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax most commonly occurs in wild and domestic animals, such as cattle, sheep, goats, camels and antelopes.Q: Why has anthrax become a current issue?A: It is said that anthrax can be used to be a potential agent in for use in biological warfare.Q: How common is anthrax and who can get it?A: Anthrax is most common in agricultural regions where it occurs in animals. These include South and Central America. When anthrax affects humnas, it is usually due to an occupational exposure to infected animals or their products. Anthrax in wild livestock has occured in the United States before now.Q: How is anthrax submitted?A: Anthrax infection can occur in three forms: cutaneous (skin), inhalation and gastrointestinal. Bacillus anthracis spores can live in soil for many years, and humans can become infected with anthrax by handling products from infected animals or by inhaling anthrax spores from contaminated animal products. Anthrax can also be spread by eating undercooked meat from infected animals. It is rare to find infected animals in the United States.Q: What are the symptoms of anthrax?A: Symptoms of disease vary depending on how the disease was contracted, but symptoms usually occur within seven days.Cutaneous: Most (about 95 percent) anthrax infections occur when the bacterium enters a cut or abrasion on the skin, such as when handling contaminated wool, hides, leather or hair products of infected animals. Skin infection begins as a raised itchy bump that resembles an insect bite but within 1-2 days develops into a vesicle and then a painless ulcer, usually one to three centimeters in diameter, with a characteristic black necrotic (dying) area in the centerInhalation: Initial symptoms may rresemble a common cold. After several days, the symptoms may progress to severe breathing problems and shock. Inhalation anthrax is usually fatal.Intestinal: The intestinal disease form of anthrax may follow the consumption of contaminated meat and is characterized by an acute inflammation of the intestinal tract. Initial signs of nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting and fever are followed by abdominal pain, vomitting of blood and severe diarrhea. intestinal anthrax results in death 25 percent to 60 percent of cases.Q: Can anthrax be spread from person-to-person?A: Direct person-to-person spread of anthrax is extremely unlikely. Communicability is not a concern in managing or visiting with patients with inhalational anthrax.Q: Is there a way to prevent infection?A: In countries where anthrax is common and vaccination levels of animals herds are low, humans should avoid contact with livestock and animal products and avoid eating meat that has not been properly slaughtered and cooked. Also, an anthrax vaccine has been licensed for use in humans. The vaccine is reported to 93 percent effective.Q: What is the anthrax vaccine?A: The vaccine is manufactured and distributed by BioPort Corporation, Lansing, Mich. The vaccine is a cell-free filtrate vaccine, which means it contains no dead or live bacteria in the preparation. The final product contains no more than 2.4 mg of aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant. Anthrax vaccines intended for animals should not be used in humans.Material for this report was compiled from The Center for Disease Control at www. cdc.com

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Aggies smash Bison, 76-30

By Chris wallaceRegister Sports EditorOn Saturday, Oct. 20, at Aggie Stadium, the Aggies of N.C. A&T scored 41 first-quarter points on their way to a 76-point effort in the 76-30 win over Howard University. The Aggies surpassed their previous record of 73 points set in 1996. Senior tailback Maurice Hicks rushed for 114 yards and four touchdowns (all in the first half) while Cornelius Gary also eclipsed the 100-yard barrier with a 119-yard performance. The Aggies also returned four interceptions for touchdowns during a streak in which they scored 63 consecutive points“I’m proud of the way our team is playing, especially our defense and special teams,” said Head Coach Bill Hayes. The Aggies piled up more than 400 yards of offense against the Bison, 383 of which were rushing yards. “Coach Keith Wagner is the offensive line coach, and I feel that he’s done the best job of coaching this season,”added Hayes. “He deserves all of the credit. Our mentality is set to dominate the opponent and we owe a lot of our offensive success to them.”

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Unity will prevail, no matter the circumstance

Four people have died and many more have been affected by the infectious disease that the government is finding hard to track down and kill. Anthrax, something not many people knew about until a few weeks ago, has protruded into the mailrooms and workplaces of thousands of Americans, looking to infect and destroy their lives.And while we fight this new enemy, another enemy, Osama Bin Laden, is still out there untouched and possibly planning further attacks on America.So where do we go from here?How do we keep safe?Who do we trust?Though it has been almost two months since the terrorist attacks, this country still needs to unite. It’s important that we don’t let fear overcome us and get us out of doing the things we love and being who we are. Unity is what brought this country to the point it is at now and unity is what will help us get past this point.It’s not just about uniting in time of turmoil, but it’s about uniting with your fellow man who may be feeling the affects of a family member being laid off, passing away or concerned for his health. It’s about comforting the comfortless, encouraging the disheartened and uplifting the distraught.Safety begins right here with us. We have an obligation to protect each other. It should be our number one priority. It was for Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Gandhi, President Roosevelt, the firefighters and police officers who died at the World Trade Center, the men and women on the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania who refused to just let the terrorists do as they pleased, and many others.A sense of urgency is among us and the only ones we can trust are the ones we’re most familiar with and the things we’re most familiar with. The church is like home to any American and it’s time to go home. It’s time to hear words of faith, comfort, encouragement and action.This is not a time for us to run into our shells and not come out. This is not a time to back down from the challenge of uniting on all fronts. This is not a time to think about yourself, but it’s a time to think about the millions who are jobless, homeless, hungry, tired, fearful or lonely.This is a call to all leaders and to all those who want change. It starts with us and it starts now.. You don’t need lots of money to change something that’s wrong; all you need is a vision and faith.My vision is to see everyone unite on all fronts, see man helping woman, boy helping girl. It’s my vision to see a better Greensboro, a better America, a faithful Greensboro and a faithful America. My faith in God himself will bring make that happen. One can put 1,000 to flight, two can put 10,000. Let us join in taking the people of this country and the people of this world to a place of no fear, but of love, peace and faith.The winner of any war is determined by who’s fighting it, how many people fighting it and whether or not they’re united.

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American Education Week activities set for Nov. 11-17

N.C. A&T will celebrate American Education Week, Nov. 11-17 with activities sponsored by the School of Education.The national theme for the week is “Together: Making Public Schools Great for Every Child.” The university’s theme for the week is “Best Practices.” Sunday, Nov. 11 – Education Sunday (churches recognize education) – Dean Book ClubAuthor: Frank Smith 7 p.m. – 9 p.m., Memorial Student Union Monday, Nov. 12 – Apples for EducatorsTuesday, Nov. 13 – Presentation: Washington School (5th graders) Speaker: Dr. Lelia Vickers, dean, A&T School of Education.Wednesday, Nov. 14- A&T Honors Excellence in TeachingThursday, Nov. 15- Presentation: Eastern Guilford Middle School (7th graders) Speaker: Dr. Velma Speight The Professional Educators Speaker Series Speaker: Danielle Cook. Educator, Common Sense FoundationSaturday, Nov. 17 -School of Education Intercollegiate Conference 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Memorial Student Union.

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Saxophonist set to appear to A&T

James Houlik, a tenor saxophonist, will present a mini-recital seminar for musicians entitled “Commecting the Dots” in Webb Hall, Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 7:30 p.m. Houlik was designated by the London Daily Mail as the “World’s Great Saxophone Virtuoso.” In his recital, Houlik, will perform and speak on the music business to students.Houlik has enjoyed a career as a saxophone soloist, a distinguished teacher and as a change agent in the music profession. He currently teaches at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh and he is the director of the Career Perspective program at the Breckenridge Music Festival in Colorado, where he works directly with the National Repertory Orchestra. Houlik performs with energy and wants to improve the future of musicians.

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BIOTERRORISM:The newest threat in America’ s fight against terrorism

News Analysis byRandy St. ClairEditor-In-ChiefA new enemy has shown its face on U.S. territory, taking the lives of four Americans and infecting many others.The deadly disease anthrax has crept into the offices of government officials, public post offices and newsrooms of several newspapers across the country placing fear in the hearts of a people who are already on edge.While President George W. Bush is giving orders to continue air strikes on Afghanistan and the U.S. continues its search for Osama Bin Laden, people of this country fear that anthrax may show up in their mailbox, at their job or even in their home.Anthrax has become a new American killer since the terrorists attacks on Sept. 11 — from the 56-year-old man dying in Florida in late September to a New Jersey woman dying a few days ago from inhalation anthrax.Fear of this newfound source of terror, which hasn’t been seen in the U.S. since the early 1900s, is spreading quickly.Congressman Tom Daschle along with ABC news anchor Tom Brokaw were almost chosen to be the next contestants for this disease that is nothing to play with.Anthrax is a disease that is generally found in cattle and rarely found on U.S. soil. It can be contracted in three forms: cutaneous (skin), inhalation or intestinal. The deadliest of them all, and the one which has claimed the lives of four civilians, is the inhalation form of anthrax.With post offices being shut down for anthrax tests and businesses, too, is any place safe from this threat of bioterrorism?President Bush has called these cases and scares of anthrax “the second front” to the war on terrorism. While he nor anyone else knows whether or not Bin Laden or his group al Qaeda are behind the spread of anthrax, linking them to this recent terror act is not so far-fetched, especially since they’re the prime suspect in the terrorist attacks. In fact, a reporter from the New York Post who contracted skin anthrax publically accused Bin Laden of being behind the spread of anthrax in America.Bioterrorism has caught the U.S. off guard just as the attacks did and now its having an affect on the general public that will be almost harder to get over than the attacks themselves. The first sign of a cold and people are going to consider themselves possibly infected with some type of anthrax. The first letter that one receives that has funny handwriting will be inspected by the local fire department or possibly the FBI. Even the sign of any white substance appearing on someone’s porch or lawn will draw immediate concerns because of the described look of this substance given by government authorities.The truth of the matter is that bioterrorism is real in this country and it’s more serious than people think, and the concern shouldn’t be in just this country, but globally.What’s even more serious is that there are other infections out there that are just as deadly that Americans are unaware of. One of them is smallpox, which is caused by the variola virus. This too can possibly be used as a weapon in biological warfare, because of it severity and its high rate in deaths, along with the fact that it doesn’t take much to transmit this disease from one person to another. Smallpox has been feared as being the most devastating of all the infectious diseases. Other infectious diseases that people ought to be aware of is the pneumonic plague, botulism and tularemia.A poll taken by Newsweek showed that Americans expect large number of civilians to die in future terrorist attacks, but majority of the Americans are willing to support the Bush administration in their fight against terrorism.

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Sculptor captures essence of history

By T.J. MooreNews EditorIt started with an idea.Just like the sit-in movement itself, the statue immortalizing the four who sat at the Woolworth counter forty one years ago, started with an idea.Sculptor James Barnhill’s idea, however stems from a photo — a famous shot of Jibreel Kazann (Ezelle Blair, Jr.), Franklin McCain, David Richmond and Joseph McNeil walking out of the resturaunt and into history. Barnhill wanted to capture the essence of the Greensboro Four by showing them not sitting but standing and marching because he thought that showing the four sitting would be dull. “Four guys sitting at a counter was static (non movement),” said Barnhill, who is artist-in-residence at N.C. A&T. Barnhill added that the four marching out of the restaurant gives a stronger visual impact.The Greensboro Four statues are intended to be a centerpiece when the campus takes shape in line with the new master plan.After the idea gained approval from Chancellor James C. Renick, Barnhill began the long process of making the statues.Ever since May, Barnhill has been scraping away to capture the spirit of the four brave and gutsy freshmen. This process of creating the statues is described as a complex process.First, Barnhill had to build the four skeletal frames and build rolling stands for support. The frames are created by one-inch steel pipes and diamond mesh material.Next, Barnhill had to take water-based clay to shape over the frame. To keep the clay from drying out, Barnhill had to keep bags over the figures. Finally, sectional molds had to be made, so the figures can go to a foundry. The foundry is the final step in the process, where the statues once made of clay will become bronze.Barnhill thinks that the fact that these four men were just ordinary college students makes that particular moment in time special. “It’s a momument of four guys, not military members or presidents, These were just people…who became heroes,” said Barnhill.Barnhill has been doing sculptors for 20 years, and he has created pieces that can be found from his native Asheville, N.C., to Mission Viejo, Calif. During his career, Barnhill believes that the Greensboro Four statue is his best work to date. “I’m actually pleased with these guys,” he said. “This is a very strong and dramatic piece.”After he has completed this statue, the current full time professor is slated to create a statue for his alma-mater, UNCG, in 2003.

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Road Trip: An inside look at the big game

By Cornelius GaryRegister Contributor(Editor’s Note: Cornelius Gary is a running back for the Aggies football team. This is his first-person account of a crucial road trip.)Oct. 26. It’s 2:45 a.m. and I’m on the bus getting ready to go to the airport to fly to Daytona. This is the first time the team will be flying since the tragedy in New York. When we arrived at the airport, there is a long security check that gives me a little more peace of mind but reminds me of why security was so strict. As we board the plane my stomach is filled with butterflies. I wonder if anyone else feels the way I do about flying, but when I see the starting quarterback draw a cross on the side of plane as we walk through the front door, I wonder no more. The flight goes great and I, along with a lot of my teammates and coaches, take a big sigh of relief. With the plane ride out of the way, it is time to focus on our goal, which is to beat Bethune-Cookman. When we arrive in Daytona, we take a bus to Mainland High School, the same school that NBA star Vince Carter attended. There, we draw a large crowd for one of our best practices.After practice, we eat dinner at a nice restaurant and then it’s off to the hotel. We meet later on that night in the hotel ballroom for a motivational speech from Coach Hayes. Coach tells us how much more important and vital this game was going to be. Not only is this game important but with everything going on this weekend, this game is special. It’s special because Coach Hicks pressed his way after his daughter was born on Friday night. It’s special because this game could determine who is going to win the conference. Guys, I cannot stress to you enough how important it is for us to win this game,” he says.A speech from Coach Hayes is more than just a pep talk for a game; a speech from Coach Hayes is a lesson in life. After the meeting, it’s back to the rooms to make sure we get plenty of rest. I don’t get much sleep because I can’t stop thinking about this big game. Bethune-Cookman is undefeated in the conference and we’re playing them on their Homecoming. If hearing about Bethune-Cookman in practice for three hours a day seems too much, try hearing it from the media and your friends all day. We eat breakfast Saturday morning at the hotel. Immediately following breakfast, we go to the hotel parking lot to do our traditional pre-game walkthrough. We leave the hotel at 11:30 a.m. The bus ride is totally quiet because everyone is focused on the game. As we arrive at the stadium, Bethune-Cookman fans are tailgating and making their decisions on where to park. When we get off the bus, what looked like a track around the football field is actually sand. The wind was blowing hard. This week, defensive back coach Daren Hart gives the pre-game talk. Coach Hart touches our hearts and gives us a reason to fight for a victory.As we take the field, the home crowd that fills both sides of the stadium welcomes us with a series of boos, however, there is a small section on the visitor’s side with about 200 Aggie fans. Bethune-Cookman wins the toss and chooses to receive. As the whistle blows, my adrenaline is flowing and I am determined to make the first hit. I am the first one to hit the man with the ball, but I miss the tackle. We score first with a field goal. With only 20 seconds left in the first half, Bethune-Cookman scores a touchdown with help from the referees. This leaves everyone upset and we are ready for payback. As the kickoff return team takes the field for the final seconds of the half, all we are thinking about is scoring. They kick the ball to the left side of the field. As they charge down the field towards us, I single out one opponent, number 29, and made the biggest hit of my life. Those who see the hit go “ooh.” I hit him so hard that my eyes cross up.During halftime our coaches tell us that this is an all-out war and we have to win. We come out in the second half pounding Bethune-Cookman. The offense scores twice and the defense continues to stop them cold. The score is 16-14. Bethune-Cookman has the ball and is trying their best to score, but our band gets in behind us and the defense comes through for us once again. The victory is sweet. Coach Hayes gets his 100th win, and Coach Hicks has some good news to take back to his wife and his newborn daughter, Nicole. Knowing that we are now on the verge of becoming the MEAC Conference champions makes the trip home on the plane a whole lot easier.

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Imes,his rhyme, the story in him

By Alexandra GrayRegister ContributorSophomore business economics major Jaeyel Imes is a young author on the rise. He has published “the rhyme, the story n me” through an innovative print-on-demand process, and has other books scheduled for publication next year.Imes, a Denver native, began writing his book in the eighth grade and completed it his senior year of high school. “The reason it took so long was because the book was originally a collection of short stories,” he says.”The main story that was used to connect all of the stories ended up being strong enough for its own book, so here it is,” says Imes.The book is about a storyteller who learns the lessons that he tells. What makes this novel so different from most mainstream novels is that narrator is telling the story to another man, and the fact that many classify it as a “hip-hop” novel.Although Imes has began his writing career early, having completed three books and is working on a fourth and fifth. The first book he wrote, “never too much,” was accepted in March of this year and is scheduled to be released in January or February. “My third book, which is a novella (a short book which is approximately 96 pages long) called “now i see” will come out Aug. 6, 2002,” says Imes. His fourth book is a cross between mystery and fantasy that is set to come out before he graduates in May 2004. The fifth book will be a spin-off of “now i see” but no release date has been set.As a young African American writer he hopes to make a precedent in merging literature and hip-hop culture. “While I won’t say that I am the first writer to try it, I will say that I am part of the beginning,” he says.Imes went on to say that he did not want to be restricted to mainstream fiction or any of the other typical genres that African American literature seems so be caught in. Being a college student, Imes also has to deal with some financial trials in trying to get his novels published. He took the non-traditional method of print-on-demand technology. “With print-on-demand, I don’t have to have caseload after caseload of books, I can have them printed as little as one at a time,” he explained. He’s also collaborating with the Economics Club for an event called “Red Day,” which will be Nov. 6. Those who wear red shirts and black pants will have a chance to receive a copy. People interested in Imes’ books may contact him at www.jaeylimes.com or www.rbanwrtr.com.

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War kept in perspective with Gibbs Hall meetings

By T. J. MooreNews EditorEver since the Sept. 11 tragedy, there have been meetings and discussions of the current state of America’s affairs on campus. Every Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m., the Department of Political Science meets in Room 123 Gibbs Hall to discuss the “War on Terrorism.” For weeks, the group of faculty members of the history and political science department, campus outsiders and a few concerned students have discussed deeper issues like how the war would affect federal expenditures like health care and the economy at large. However, on Oct. 24, the forum tackled another important issue: media coverage. Department of Political Science interim chair Dr. Claude Barnes hosted the forum and gave his own spin on how mainstream media networks like CNN, ABC, NBC and CBS are covering the crisis.In his presentation, Barnes was critical of the mainstream media, claiming that the media was an example of “profiles in cowardice.” Barnes accuses the media of not sharing more information and opinions with the public. One example Barnes gave was when Politically Incorrect host Bill Mahr made a controversial, anti-war statement one night about how America was the real cowards for bombing Afghanastan and the Taliban.For that comment, Politically Incorrect was almost cancelled and Mahr had to appear on numerous news shows to apologize for his statements. When asked to explain further about the media being cowardly, Barnes defended his statement by reiterating the job of the media. “The press is suspposed to give out objective and unbiased information. The press censor themselves when policy will be inaccurate,” said Barnes. “What we have done was provide alternate sources of information that is beyond the mainstream media.”Barnes talked about sources such as “Common Dreams,” which is a compliation of articles from different organizations, Real network, which has many audio and video sites and The Nation magazine’s website, which features a newly added resource page and web letters concerning the attacks.You can find the links to those online services and others like them by loging on to www.poli.ncat.edu and clicking on research links. This gives you access to all of the alternative news sources regarding the Sept. 11 attacks.

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Muslim leader speaks peace

By Tarah HollandEntertainment EditorImam W. Deen Mohammed, speaking Thursday, Nov. 1, at an Interfaith Unity Week event, said that the suicide bombers who attacked the World Trade Center would not find their actions acceptable to God.Mohammed, the son of the late Nation of Islam founder Elijah Mohammed, has led the Muslim American Society since his father’s death in 1975. He has taken part in the World Parliament of Religious Leaders for the Survival of the Earth and serves on the Advisory Panel for Religious Freedom Abroad formed by former U.S. secretary of state Madeline Albright. Mohammed said the faith of Islam is in fact an extremely peaceful religion. “Islam, by its language, means of peace. It and everything about it comes from the word peace,” he explained.In response to the Sept. 11 terrorist bombings, Mohammed gave his view of those who gave their lives in the name of Islam.”Those suicide bombers who wanted to give their lives to God [should realize] that taking their own life and killing innocent people will not be a gift accepted by God,” he said.At the end of Mohammed’s speech, the floor was open for audience questions. Many of the questions were centered on Islam and its relation to other religions, especially Christianity.Mohammed responded by saying, “Islam should not be seen as a religion separate of Judaism and Christianity because many of our practices are similar.”A crowd of students and many members of the Greensboro community filled the Memorial Union Ballroom for the one day event. Also in attendance were members of A&T’s Muslim Student Association.Terrence Mohammed, representing the Muslim student group, said the organization wants to foster a vision of peace on campus.

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