20 questions

By Dijon Rolle1. How many people actually got into the classes that they wanted? Can you say, “Thank the lord for online registration”?2. How many of us still don’t know who their advisor is and don’t care since we registered online anyway?3. Which of the following classes seems to always be closed on the first day?A. Personal HealthB. The only section that the “cool professor” teaches.C. The prerequisite for that class you need to be taking now.4. When are we going to get those “new and improved” student IDS…really?Can you say “I need mine before I graduate please”.5. Now that Halloween is long over can we please get rid of the “lawn ghosts” and rotten pumpkins?6. What was the worse Halloween “treat” you received back in the day?A. Canned goodsB. Household itemsC. Pennies or other loose changeD. Field peas or a box of raisins7. Aren’t we glad that Alicia Keys finally dropped a new video?8. Is it just us or is that dude still not cute in the second video either? ,9. Ladies…how many of us almost fell out when we heard that Maxwell was coming to Greensboro? ( For those that don’t know …December 11th Holla!)10. What if Maxwell doesn’t show up?11. Doesn’t your night class seem a little harder to get to since the time went back?12. Why is the parking lot still packed after 5 p.m.?13. Does everybody have a night class this semester or what?14. Whatever happened to the good Saturday morning cartoons? Can you still say Thunder cats Hoooooooo!15. Why are those Geico car insurance commercials so hilarious?16. We know that parking is still bad…but have some people lost their mind parking in reserve spots like they can’t get towed? (You know you wrong for tryin’ to park in the chancellor’s spot ).17. Why are some of us just now gettin’ back from Atlanta?18. Why don’t they just take the elevator out of Crosby since it never works?19. Which is the best elective for seniors?A. Acting for non-theater majorsB. Anything with the word appreciation in itC. That arts and crafts class everybody took last semester.20. Why is this year almost over…already?

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Students find shopper’s delight in Plato’s closet

By Carrina M. RichmondRegister ContributorAre you tired of spending excessive amounts of money on name-brand clothing? Are you annoyed at all the extra gear in your wardrobe that you no longer wear? There is a simple solution to your dilemma called Plato’s Closet. This particular closet is America’s first resale chain targeted specifically for high school and college students.Plato’s Closet was started a few years ago in Columbus, Ohio, and sold to Grow Biz International Inc., the creators of retail chains Once Upon A Child, Play it Again Sports, Music-Go -Round and Retool. Grow Biz wanted a clothing chain that targets mostly teens and young adult consumers. There are now 45 Plato’s Closets nationwide. One of the franchise owners in the Greensboro store, David Farmer, decided on this location because of the high percentage of college students in this area. “Teens are hip, and they know what’s happening, and they are doing most of the buying,” said Farmer.In the Greensboro location there are 20 employees, most high school and college students. The atmosphere has the comfort of a teen / young adult bedroom, with three televisions, tuned to MTV and BET, positioned in front of a leather couch. “It appeals to college students because most of the employees are in college, and the with the friendly atmosphere, of different ages, I look forward to coming to work,” said Trea, a 20-year-old employee who is also a GTCC student. If you are interested in cashing in some of your name-brand clothing, Plato’s Closet will pay you on the spot for all items accepted. The amount is determined by the condition, brand, size and demand. Plato’s Closet is located on Battleground Avenue behind Your House restaurant and across from Biscuitville and KFC. The store is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

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African-American talk show hosts need a “real” message.

By Tamika HudsonThe era of talk shows has sparked an interest in the African American entertainment industry. Viewing the latest talk shows this past season I can only assume the spark has blown out due to numerous cancellation of talk show host by today’s hottest icons. With the odds against African American sit-coms, movies, singers, rappers and film and movie producers it is an understatement to say blacks can make it in the entertainment industry. The question is how have two of the most influential people of the African American race been able to withstand the continuous changes of the talk show industry? And secondly why have their successors crumbled at the opportunity to succeed in quality entertainment?Personally, Oprah Winfrey and Montel Williams were at the right place at the right time. During their peak in television not too many faces of color were viewed on an everyday bases. Producers probably felt they could take a chance and fill a quota simultaneously and determine their future according to viewers. The one thing that has made these two solid is individuality. Years have gone by and the style of talk shows has changed, but they have yet to compromise those changes. Viewing the Montel Williams Show closely, I believe his purpose is to motivate. I hardly ever see Montel provoking a confrontation or hosting a sleazy show that would degrade his guest and viewers. It feels as if he never wants to leave a show until all issues have been resolved. His atmosphere is professional yet warm. Being that he once held a position as a naval intelligence officer and motivational speaker, I believe he has lasted on the air so long because of his personal connection with people. In laymen’s terms he solves the worlds problems one-day at a time.When I hear the name Oprah I think of dedication. I feel she was destine to touch the lives of the weak hearted. Seen by over twenty-six million viewers in the United States and one hundred and twelve countries, Oprah is the highest rated talk show in television history. I love Oprah because she not only reaches out through her show, but she also has a special Angel Network that reaches out to everyday people aside from her regular broadcast. Being that she admires teachers, she continuously awards teachers across the country. She gives her audience what they want. Starting just seventeen years ago, Oprah has had many opportunities to end her contract, but she feels she must continue because her journey has yet to begin.Recently, young black icons have found a niche for becoming the next Oprah or Montel. The problem is they start by mirroring these talk shows that have been on the air for well over ten years. Leaving no room to grow into their own unique vibe, today’s beginning hosts feel they must copy others in order to make it. Shows such as the Ananda Lewis Show, the Queen Latifah Show, Iyanla, Forgive and Forget, and Oh Drama are just duplicates of past and well-established talk shows. Unfortunately, viewers grow tired of watching the same structure of entertainment. The purpose of a talk show is to allow people to express themselves, solve problems, and motivate others. I would rather watch a show that speaks the truth then a show that is unsure of the truth. Foremost, the show has a variety of topics. I feel a show should have a theme and focus on that theme yearly, it is unorganized to talk about love one day and about strippers the next. Final thoughts: I believe African Americans have a powerful voice in this nation. The only way we will continue to have the freedom of speech on air is if we are prepared physically, mentally and spiritually.

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Cafeteria in final stage

By Osen Bowser, Jr.Register ComtributorWilliams Cafeteria, which has been closed for 13 months, will reopen in March after the renovation project is complete. The project costs $10.1 million and is being managed by Andy Perkins, university engineer.Williams Cafeteria has served the students of N.C. A&T for the past 30 years. When it first opened in 1971, the enrollment of the university was 4,300. Today, the university enrolls approximately 8,000 students. It has undergone renovation to meet and serve the needs of all of its students.”The new Williams Cafeteria will provide an awesome experience for student dining,” said Todd Johnson, director of auxiliary services. “Not only will the new cafeteria serve as a dining hall, it will also serve as a place where students can relax and do many things all at once.” Johnson believes that the environment is important to the students and where they choose to dine. The new cafeteria will possess a new, wide-open environment, with a balcony overlooking the Holland Bowl. Paintings and photographs will reflect the history of the university.In addition to a better environment, the new cafeteria will also include data connections for Internet access and restrooms on every level for students and staff.The main improvements for the new cafeteria will be better food choices and a larger dining area. The renovated cafeteria will have two branded concepts, such as the Chick-Fil-A and Blimpie’s in the Aggie Sit-In, as well as a chancellor’s dining area and a special dining area for small events such as meetings and receptions.There will be two levels of dining in the new cafeteria. The upper level will serve as the main dining area for students. The lower level will include the branded concepts and special dining areas. Seating capacity will rise to approximately 1,200, versus 800 in the old Williams Cafeteria, so more students will be able to eat in the cafeteria at one time.There will be five different serving stations. One will be a display cooking station where students can place their order and watch it being prepared. Students will be able to choose from pasta to meats at the display cooking station. Other cooking stations will offer pizza and “homestyle” foods, and the remaining two are currently being decided.”Students will be amazed at all the wonderful choices they will have when the cafeteria reopens,” says Johnson.Johnson and his staff also responded to the different meal plans that students have.”We are committed to revamping our meal plan system so that we can offer more flexibility in options for students to decide where they want to eat. Student meal plans are a function of the facilities that use them and we think new meal plans will work better in our new facility to accommodate everyone,” says Johnson.Currently, students are using the same meal plans that were used when eating in the old Williams Cafeteria. Students who live on campus and have a university meal plan are allowed to eat only three times per week in the Aggie Sit-In, while students living in Aggie Suites have the option of a declining balance meal plan and can eat wherever they want whenever they choose. When the new cafeteria opens, new meal plans will allow students more options as to when and where they can eat.”I think it is unfair that students with a regular university meal plan are only allowed to eat in the Aggie Sit-In three times a week. We should be allowed the same opportunity as students with the declining balance meal plans. We are a part of the university just as they are,” says Kevin Keene, a junior majoring in computer science.In addition to overseeing the Williams cafeteria renovation, Johnson also oversaw the Aggie Sit-In project in the student union.”Students have responded well to the new Aggie Sit-In. They told us what they wanted to see and we responded,” says Johnson. The Aggie Sit-In serves approximately 1,200 students daily. The peak times are 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. for lunch and 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. for dinner.Changes are being made in the Aggie Sit-In to better serve students. Two computers have been installed on the south wall in the Sit-In for students to access the Internet and there will be more checkout lines in the future. “We want students to feel as if the Sit-In is a ‘classroom’ away from the classroom. We want to provide a real sense of the sit-in movement for A&T students. We want them to feel the rich history of the university in the Sit-In,” says Johnson.Johnson says that the students decided the types of foods they wanted to see in the Sit-In as a result of surveys. The two branded concepts in the new cafeteria will be decided the same way. Auxiliary Services would like for students to participate on the food services committee. Interested people may contact Auxiliary Services at 334-7876 or email toddj@ncat.edu.

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Students receive recognition at conference

Three N.C. A&T students participated in the 31st Annual Conference of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics. The conference was held Oct. 11 at the Koury Convention Center in Greensboro.The students, all sophomores, are Laveda Casterlow, Howard Conyers, and Roy Melton. They presented their freshman calculus research projects, which were conducted last year under the direction of Dr. Gilbert Casterlow Jr., an A&T mathematics professor.Casterlow’s a biology major, research topic was “The Patterns of Growth and Decay as they Relate to Food-Born Microorganisms, the Radioactivity of Elements, and Newton’s Method of Cooling.” Conyers, an agricultural and bio-system engineering major, topic was “Hyperbolic Functions and Their Various Relationships.”Melton, an electrical engineer major, research was entitled, “Parametric Equations and Their Applications in the Real World.”The research projects provided the students an early introduction to undergraduate research in mathematics as related to various other disciplines. Technology support for the PowerPoint presentations, which included digital camera work, and camcorder work, was provided by a fourth student, Kambale Musavuli. Each of these students have grade point averages in excess of 3.7 on a 4.0 scale.

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Aggie Essence works hard on new moves, new image

By Trina LoganRegister ContributorWhen you think about school spirit and entertainment, you think of cheerleaders, the A&T Marching Machine and Golden Delight. Do we really ever notice our own dancing troupe “Aggie Essence,” which presents hot entertainment during school events? Do we realize the average training day that goes into performing? Do we realize the community service that they do to support different causes? Aggie Essence have been a part of A&T’s scene for many years. The group combines hip-hop moves with classic dance routines. However, Aggie Essence has not always had a good reputation. “Each year Aggie Essence has endured a lot of negative feedback.,” said Eboni Davis, a junior broadcast news major and the captain of Aggie Essence. “I am optimistic in believing that the students of A&T will critique us for skill and creativity rather than stereotypes of the past.””I feel that it is not important for us to prove anyone stereotype to be wrong. But it is important to do our personal best and if our personal best is our best then it is what everyone will notice,” said Gianina Hayes, a senior broadcast production major and assistant advisor. Aggie Essence members dance five days a week for two hours. They work out two days during the week for an hour, running and climbing the Moore Gym stairs. At Tuesday and Thursday workouts, they receive outside help. Their personal trainer does cardio with the group for 20 minutes. Then the group is divided to do upper and lower body strength training. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, they work on the routines themselves.Aggie Essence also does numerous volunteer activities in the community. They put together the “Little Miss Aggie Essence Pageant” in which they mentor to little girls. On Dec. 1 they will be participating in the Winter Walk for Aids.Aggie Essence seems to be starting off with the right tactics to have a promising year. “Our new members seem to be very dedicated & talented because all of them have had previous experience,” Hayes said. “Our overall objective is to perform at halftime during basketball season,” said Davis. “The future plans are to get the girls conditioned so that the girls can go to camp this summer in order to be in competition squad 2002-2003.”

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Vets talk dedication at ceremony

By T. J. MooreNews EditorVeterans, families of the deceased and members of the class of 1947 gathered on Nov. 8 to honor past and present military veterans.The Veterans Memorial, located outside of the Student Union was packed with speakers eager to share their war experiences that have led them to be who they are today. The brief ceremony honored those who lost their lives in World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam.The ceremony opened with remarks by Army ROTC Lt. Col. Larry Burnett. Burnett took a moment to reflect why this particular Veterans Day is important. “Because of the war on terrorism, this Veterans Day is different from previous,” Burnett told the audience. “Since September, people turned to the military for national strength.”The second speaker was the professor of Aerospace Studies, Air Force ROTC Lt. Col. Thomas Sinclair. In his speech, Sinclair talked about the themes of Devotion, Dedication of Duty and the self-sacrifices that the 17 men made to their country in those times of war. Sinclair also mentioned that the current generation of cadets have those same principles. This ceremony also paid homage to the class who erected the monument, the class of 1947. On behalf of the class, Dr. Issac Barnett said a few remarks. “The class of 1947 is extremely proud to be part of the ceremony today,” he said.The ceremony closed with the placing of a red, white and blue wreath near the granite monument to the sound of “Taps.”

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International Education Week offers a world of learning

U. S. International Education Week 2001 will be held Nov. 12-16 at N.C. A&T. The theme of the week is “The World: Learn it, Live it, Lead it.”Events include:Monday, Nov. 124-6 p.m., opening in the Memorial Union, featuring the E. Gwynn Dancers.6-8 p.m., Racial & Ethnic Profiling, Stallings Ballroom at MSU.8 p.m., Candlelight Vigil/ Walk for Peace, starting in the Obermeyer Lot.

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Q&A

Misconception of what Islam stands for has surfaced since the Sept. 11 attacks. The following questions and answers will put in to perspective the purpose and reason for Islam.

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Evil has many faces

On any other day, I usually don’t bother to express my views on the opinion page. Any other day I usually just sit in front of the computer in The Register office to lay out ads in the newspaper, and handle all the money, but last Wednesday was not any other day. Last Wednesday was the day, while sitting in front of the computer like I always do, I heard of an act so disgusting, that I felt it was worth talking about. An act so ignorant, that I felt it was worth writing about. Students from two white fraternities at Auburn University, Delta Sigma Phi and Beta Theta Pi, threw a Halloween party, and during the party they thought it would be cool to take racially offensive pictures. And in some of those pictures the groups of boys were made up in black face and wearing Omega Psi Phi T-shirts.What happened at Auburn University was more than ignorance. It was more than a cruel prank, one Greek letter organization trying to poke fun at another to cause a little controversy. What happened at Auburn University was plain and simple, a symbol of hate.I am not in a fraternity and I am not from Alabama, nor have I ever visited Auburn University, so I do not know why they chose Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. to be included in their Halloween mockery. I can only speculate because it is one of the oldest African-American fraternities in the country, and the organization like all the other African-American fraternities and sororities, has a strong and rich heritage with chapters all across the nation. The fraternity probably had the strongest influence and exposure at Auburn University, something the people depicted in the photos probably saw as a threat. The chapter at Auburn is the oldest African-American Greek letter organization on their campus, and an incident like this will only make the chapter stronger, and even more powerful than before.Now that our country is at war, America has fallen into a comfort zone regarding race relations within our own country. People tend to believe that since we are fighting an enemy on the other side Atlantic Ocean that everybody still here in America has the same patriotic aspirations to bond together under the American flag. Well, I personally viewed the racist pictures on the web-site, www.Tolerance.org (a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center) and what I saw was far from a symbol of patriotism. I saw a group of bammas (since The Register is affiliated with the university I’ll refrain from using profanity) united together under a different kind of flag. A flag that represented centuries of pain and suffering for African-Americans, a flag that some people thought would be forgotten after the boycott in South Carolina. I saw the Confederate flag. I saw a flag that symbolizes hate. A hatred whose foundation is deeply rooted in the soil of America. Racism has been around since the beginning, and has never really showed any signs of going away. What happened at Auburn was a much-needed wakeup call. Maybe now Americans will reopen their eyes to the evil here next door to us, since I think they closed them, or at least squinted a little since the attacks of Sept. 11. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying what happened on Halloween indirectly had a positive effect on America because it heightened our social awareness. In my opinion, 300-plus years of oppression and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s is all the eye-opener I’ll ever need. I don’t need a group of jerks dressed up in offensive costumes to open mine for me.

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Holiday season brings credit woes

By Shakinta M. JohnstonRegister Staff WriterYou better not shout, you better not cry. You’ve got no money, but Visa will get you by. Credit cards are marking the town.It’s that time again. With a little over 50 days left in the holiday shopping season, most jolly shoppers aren’t worried about buying their families big and expensive gifts or sumptuous holiday meals. They know Visa, Discover, American Express and MasterCard will buy gifts for them.Tiffany Hughes, senior psychology major, is looking forward to the holiday shopping season.”I plan on doing a lot of Christmas shopping for family and friends this year,” said Hughes. “I estimate spending about $650 while shopping.”Hughes went on to say that the purchases would be made with credit. Since, she prefers the convenience of credit to cash, Hughes anticipates a merry shopping season. But she isn’t the only person looking forward to the precious union of plastic sliding through metallic shafts seeking credit approval.”We already plan on seeing an increase in our credit card use for the holiday season,” said Circuit City employee and A&T psychology major Kevin Harris. “Most people aren’t going to buy a lot of expensive items, but the lower-priced VCRs and DVDs for Christmas.”Harris continued to say that holiday purchasing isn’t quite at the increase it will be on the day after Thanksgiving, the biggest shopping day of the year.”I’ve seen people start lining up at 7 a.m. for holiday shopping,” said Harris. “I don’t expect this year to be any different.”Clothing and electronic retails aren’t the only markets noticing and preparing for the onslaught of credit-welding consumers. With Thanksgiving around the corner, some grocery stores are witnessing more and more shoppers paying with plastic.Scott Haines, store manager of Harris Teeter located at 5710 W. High Point Road, says 35 percent gross revenue is attributed to credit card purchases and that number is expected to increase in coming weeks.”We expect an increase of credit card purchases around the first weekend in November,” said Haines.Haines also believes consumers are using credit cards more because of a “heightened sense of economy.””Most people want to keep their cash around them, so they use their credit cards,” said Haines.While the increase of credit card use may be a welcome sight for some, other outlets haven’t yet experienced the credit card frenzy.”This time of year, you can expect to see a credit card use increase. But, here the increase isn’t really noticed until close to Christmas,” said Mary Dickerson, customer service manager of Harris Teeter on Summit Avenue.The lack of credit increase in the Summit Avenue’s Harris Teeter may be attributed to its location. Located at a primary spot for student patronage, the store sees credit use changes as students arrive and leave the campus. But are credit cards really the glitz, glamour and convenience that consumers think they are? Not always, according to customer service representatives from Encore Collections.Collection representatives say increased credit card use without proper payment can result in phone calls, letters and marks against credit. While most collection payments are made right after income tax returns are filed, there are some accounts that must be handled immediately.So what measures can be taken to keep credit card use from getting the best of consumers during the holiday season? And how can consumers recognize a potential financial problem?Credit card debt consultants from the website creditcarddebtsolutions.com offer several signs of impending financial credit problems that include being continually late making payments, paying minimum balance, approaching limits on credit cards and finding it difficult to save money. Avoiding credit card debt isn’t difficult. Simply figure out names, addresses, and how much money is owed to creditors. Then develop an approved plan to pay off credit card debts. But perhaps the best advice for credit card use can be summed up with good common sense. Don’t buy what’s wanted. Buy what’s needed. Don’t live beyond your means. And remember all that glitters isn’t gold.Credit reports can be obtained by calling the three major credit card agencies. Contact Transunion at www.transunion.com or (800) 916-8800, Experian at www.experian.com or (888) 397-3742 and Equifax at www.equifax.com or (800) 685-1111.

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