Greensboro’s Triad Stage finds talent in A&T’s theater program

Lights, camera and Aggies! Greensboro’s Triad Stage prepares for its Feb. 19 premier of Lynn Nottage’s “Crumbs From the Table of Joy.” The play will be staring Aggie alumna, Kelli Rashana Brown and current Aggie, Zonya Love Johnson.Brown is a 2000 graduate of A&T and is looking forward to her rising career as an actress.”I give all glory to God, my Lord, and Savior, Jesus Christ who has definitely blessed me. I will be able to become a part of the union for professional actors because of my experience at the theater,” said Brown. “In the majority of auditions in New York and L.A., you must be a part of the union,” said Brown.Brown has the lead role of Ernestine, the oldest daughter of Godfrey Crump, who moves his family, along with his sister-in-law, to Brooklyn to follow his worship of “Father Devine.”Through her loving and supportive aunt, Ernestine is able to express her inner-self and personality.”Ernestine Crump is 17 and really has no friends and is very lonely, until she begins to get closer to her aunt,” said Brown.Brown prepares herself by using many of the same methods she uses for most of the roles that she takes on.”I had a lot of lines to memorize and I like to take time to study the text before I dive into the character. It is a long process and requires a lot of research and living in the script. I like to have plenty of rest and be in good health,” said Brown. Although she is no stranger to dramatic roles, Brown had to adjust the personality of Ernestine.”The transition into this role was difficult because it required much more of a country, plain, reserved and quiet personality which is the complete opposite of myself. I had to balance all of the emotion of the role as well, so it was a challenge,” said Brown. Brown also feels honored to be a part of the production at the Triad Stage.”This play will definitely open opportunities for me as an actress. The Triad Stage is becoming a new part of history and I am honored to make history along with it. “Crumbs From the Table of Joy” was written by rising African American playwright Lynn Nottage. It is a dramatic and insightful look at a southern family and the struggles they go through as they lose their mother, the glue that had held them together since the beginning.As told through the eyes of daughter Ernestine, the play tells the story of a two daughters who find it difficult to recover from the lost of their mother and adjust to the interracial remarriage of their father. They also have to cope with leaving their southern home to relocate in a city where the environment is unknown and sometimes harsh. Brown says she can also find similarities in her life and the life of Ernestine.”I can relate to Ernestine in different ways. In the play, the sisters are close and love each other, but at the same time get on each other’s nerves. It is the same for me and my sister. Ernestine also has to deal with a step-mother,” said Brown. “My boyfriend has a child and I am seeing how one has to cope with someone from the outside.”Brown has plans for her future and is almost certain of where it is headed.”God may change my plans, but for now I have no plans for graduate school at the moment, but when I do, it’s going to be Yale,” said Brown.The play will premiere at the Triad Stage Feb. 15 through Mar. 10. Tickets range from $8 to $30 and vary in terms of seating arrangements and depending on the day of the week.Connie Mahan, director of marketing and communications for the Triad Stage, is proud to have A&T represented in the play as well as at the theater.”It has been really exciting collaborating with A&T and its theater program. I think that their work is great. I personally had the opportunity to see Zonya in her performance in ‘Black Nativity’ last fall. She was great,” said Mahan. “It has also been exciting watching these girls moving from acting as students to acting as professionals and I feel honored to be a part of it.”Johnson stars as Ermina, Crump’s youngest daughter, who finds herself somewhat in the shadow of her older sister. Johnson was performing out of town at the American College Theater Festival in the Irene Ryan Competition and could not be reached for an interview.

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A&T instructor by day, opera diva by night

Jessica J. Van Ord, an instructor in the music department, is making a new name for herself as an opera singer.Van Ord had the opportunity to serenade a large crowd at UNCG’s Aycock Auditorium on Jan. 24 and 26.She received her master’s of arts degree in music and is currently studying for the completion of her doctorate in Voice Performance at UNCG as well.The Italian opera presented at UNCG entitled “Cavalleria Rusticana” (rustic chivalry) took place in the 1880s in Sicily. Santuzza, played by Van Ord, is a woman torn between the sadness of her lost faith, and love never found; caught in a triangle of two men’s love for another woman.Written by Pietro Mascagni in 1890, the piece is a melodrama summarized into one act. Other performers who contributed to the main cast include Turiddu, played by Brian Carter (the lover of Santuzza); Alfio, played by Warren Coker (a local carrier that is married to Lola); Lola, played by Jennifer Mello (married to Alfio, but secretly seeing Turiddu)And Mamma Lucia, played by Renee Sokol (mother of Alfio, and emotional comfort to Santuzza).”Singing is an outlet; it allows for others to relate to the emotion that I am emitting,” said Van Ord. “Also, the works in which focus is exerted tend to relate to real-life experiences.” Van Ord also sings with the choir at the First Presbyterian Church on North Elm Street, exercising once again the power in the influence of her voice, and the emotions brought forth from her singing.

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Loyalty sparks unity, unity inspires change

Can I truly say that I love my brother or sister if I openly put them to shame? Can I truly say that I have their best interest at heart if I take no consideration as to how they feel? Can I call myself a real friend if I turn my back at the first sign of trouble?No. No. And no.What ever happened to brotherly or sisterly love? Where life wasn’t about I get mine and you get yours? To live such a life is sad. It’s also a selfish way to live. Whatever happened to I got your back and you got mine? Friendships are a dime a dozen, right? Well, why don’t we value them as such? For some, friendship is only a means to get something from someone else. Whether it be money, fame or notoriety, it’s something that’s built on a rather weak foundation. But for others a true friend is like adding someone to the family. A foundation that will never fall, but always stand. Weathering the storm, protection from all hurt and harm. The purpose of the friendship is to bring each other from one level to the next. Constantly in encouragement, prayer and support despite what things may seem to be. People change faces daily. Why? How? It puzzles me to see how one day we can be mad cool and the next total strangers. Life is way too short and much too complicated for the cat and mouse game. A game, I might add, that no one wins. Life is about living consistently. The way to prosperity is to constantly do the things that require you to be wealthy. Meaning, people must save, make good investments, tithe and manage their finances. The way to a life less complicated is surrounding yourself with consistent people. People whose behaviors, attitudes or emotions won’t change just because you say something they don’t like, or just because you disagree.I can remember a time where life wasn’t so complicated. Where having a cell phone didn’t matter, a letter would suffice. I can remember a time where it wasn’t embarrassing to pick someone up when they fell. I can even remember a time where the motto of the ages was, “Don’t worry, be happy” yet we constantly put each other down. We talk about coming together as a people, race and society yet we’re divided by things such as latest brands, skin color or money. If that’s what this world has come to, the end is only tragic. Wouldn’t it be great to see a race, society or country truly unite? Unification isn’t about feeling sorry for each other. Unification is about action. It’s about taking action against stereotypes, prejudice, racism, hate crimes and disillusions. To be truly unified would be the greatest accomplishment this country can ever achieve. For a nation to come together on it’s own terms, not sparked by disaster, terror or war, would mean that views have been compromised. Which is truly the force behind unification. The grass may be greener on the other side, but the other side can never be reached by one person alone. It wasn’t until the children of Israel believed in their hearts that they could go into the land God promised them that they actually went in. Not just one person believed but an entire nation believed. So where did all this come from?I was in a class and there was a presentation given, and the young lady blatently tried to defame another person’s character. It was done with no remorse. The student seemed pleased with the comment made. Other students laughed while the person called out simply sat there, possibly wondering where the statement came from, what sparked the outburst of emotion or why me? There’s a rule I try to follow that my mother and grandmother taught me a long time ago. If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say nothing at all.I’m in anticipation for a day, time or hour that we wouldn’t be warring against ourselves but against the one that seeks to destroy us.I anticipate a day where words will turn into action and action will be sparked by emotion and emotion sparked by love and love overcoming hate. What a day it would be. A day, a time, an hour of assurance. You got my back and I got yours. Climbing the mountain was never said to be easy, and never said to be impossible.

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Absolutely poetic

On Feb. 13, there was hardly an empty seat in Harrison Auditorium as students, faculty and families of the performers came out en masse to celebrate African-American history, culture and the joys of being “Young, Gifted and Black.”This celebration featured some of the finest talent that N.C. A&T has to offer. The performers paid homage to the rich legacy of African-American culture and history with their diverse talent, in the areas of gospel, poetry, hip-hop and R&B and fashion.From the opening, the N.C. A&T Fellowship Gospel Choir rocked the crowd with an upbeat and funky processional and selections. Afterwards, Steven McQueen gave an uplifting rendition of “Lift Every Voice and Sing”After the Black National Anthem, Mr. Aggie Desmond Stowe introduced the Master and Mistress of Ceremony, Jamaal Stewart and Erin Morris. Then, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Dr. Roselle Wilson officially greeted the crowd.The first segment of the program was Song and Dance. The audience was treated to a variety of songs and a raw performance by the Dudley High School Stepteam.David Watkins gave a soul-stirring rendition of “My Funny Valentine” for all of the jazz lovers and lovers in the audience. The audience turned into a sea of applause and screams after that.The group Infinity took the stage to perform the three-song medley of “Carolina Swing,” “Freakin You” and “Killing Me Softly” The auditorium’s sound system was having problems and the audience sympathizedA video sequence compiled by Andrew Lofter was shown. “Movers and Shakers in Black History” showed images and gave a small bio on legendary civil rights figures like Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, The A&T Four, Martin Luther King Jr. and the Brown vs. Board of Education case.To close out the segment highlights, the Dudley High School Stepteam took the audience back in the day with themes from “227,” “The Jeffersons” and “Good Times.” The team stepped to the likes of Edwn Star’s “War,” Zapp and Roger’s “More Bounce to the Ounce” and “Computer Love” and Marvin Gaye’s classic “Let’s Get It On.” These younguns brought back dance steps from the ’80, their movements smooth and precise.In the second segment, poets spewed nothing less than stanzas of fire. Deonte Staats kicked off this mini poetry slam with a scathing view of interracial relationships and a tribute to black-on-black love with “Fever.” Next came Nado and Russell Dozier with their untitled work that incorporates hip-hop and their poetry, but they too were plagued by sound problems.The final poet of the segment came all the way from Baltimore. Jason Jacob McCraw’s poem gives his intense view on the 9/11 attacks, declaring boldly “what goes around, comes around.”The show closed with a fashionable view into history. The Verge modeling troupe took the audience back and way, way back into our history with a civil rights scene, a slavery scene and a tribute to Africa. In the civil rights segment, four models were shown with their bodies covered in foil emulating the newly erected A&T Four statue. Then, Bilal’s “Soul Sista” blared through the sound system.McCraw recited a poem as this scene featured historic figures like Rosa Parks, Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam, Black Panther Party and sports figures like Muhammad Ali and Florence Griffith-Joyner. Finally, they stripped foil off the ‘statues’ to reveal the A&T Four come to life. In the second scene, the audience was invited to take a trip to the Verge Plantation. Some male models appeared shirtless and chained as well. It was risky and interesting but another great scene.The final scene in the show and the program was the tribute to Africa. Models appeared in the traditional red black and green from the motherland to the tune of Michael Jackson’s “They Don’t Care about Us.” Performers gave it their all and made “Young Gifted and Black” a hot show. Hey, a nearly full house can’t be wrong.

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Video of Jubilee Singers is tribute to African American history

Dr. Clifford Watkins is hosting a showing of the video “Jubilee Singers, Sacrifice and Glory (The American Experience),” at 3 p.m. Feb. 20 in the choir room of Frazier Hall as part of a tribute to the ongoing history of African Americans.Watkins has been a teacher at A&T for 20 years and has taught black studies for a number of those. “Originally, the video of the Jubilee Singers was intended to be just for his class, but realizing the importance of knowledge in the aspect of black history (and the fact that most was glossed over), I decided to make it available to the general voice,” commented Watkins. “Like many stories throughout history, people normally understand the events that lead it to happen, and the aftermaths of said situations; however, they are unfamiliar with the meat in the sandwich,” said Watkins. This video gives students an opportunity to experience a part of black heritage. Fisk University, in Nashville, Tenn., (est. 1866) was a school proposed for the benefit of free blacks, and an opportunity for them to achieve the same educational status as whites. Despite the claim made by the government to look after newly released slaves, nothing was done when the university almost went under. The people took it upon themselves, creating the Jubilee Singers to raise money to keep the stream of education trickling. Watkins said that challenges ceaselessly present themselves, but the desire for knowledge was too strongly embedded in the minds of these students, and the will just as prevalent. Watkins, named outstanding teacher of the year for the College of Arts & Sciences for the 2001-’02 term, feels it behooves us to bring to light some aspects of black history. He received a Ph.D. and master’s in music education at Southern Illinois University and a Bachelor of Arts in Music Education at Clark Atlanta University. With professional experiences extending to being special assistant to the dean for curriculum in the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of music (department chair, 1982-’00), Watkins has earned a prestigious place in African-American studies at A&T. Professional committees that Watkins has been involved in include president, N.C. Association of Music Schools (1996-’98) and Board of Directors for the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra (1994-2000). Watkins has achieved many honors including being listed in the 17th edition of Who’s Who in the South and Southwest. (1980). He also conducted honors ceremonies for President James Carter and Hastings Banda of the Republic of Malawi in 1979. He has performed with such noted entertainers as B.B. King, Gladys Knight and Gregory Hines. Watkins has done a lot in his career, and is attempting to do more by bringing this video series for the benefit of the Aggie students.

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AKA chapter observes its founding, 94 years of service

On Jan. 15, the ladies of the Alpha Phi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. celebrated 94 years of service to all mankind.The sorority is the first American Greek letter organization established by and for black women. The birthplace of this sorority is Howard University, where Ethel Hedgement Lyle of St. Louis, Mo., formed the idea. The founder’s day program, entitled “Radiant Light,” began with a welcome from Andrea Buston, followed by the meditation from Laura Barbour.To honor all of the founders of the sorority, the ladies from the Alpha Phi chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. lined the rear of McNair Auditorium as they each portrayed a founder by telling some of their life stories. Some of them were educators and nurses; many of them went on to seek higher education. All of the ladies gathered at the bottom of the auditorium and lit the candles in memory of the founding ladies who all became “Ivies upon the wall.”Fathia Pinder read the history while remaining in the spirit of remembering the founders. Rhonda Gray, president of the Alpha Phi chapter, introduced the speaker for the evening. Jennifer Martin, a member of the sorority, gave a speech titled “The Wait of A Woman.” Grabbing the attention of many of the males in the room, she expressed how the rainbow of African American woman flows from honey, brown sugar and milky dark chocolate complexion. The wait of a women involves how the stages of a women happens over a period of time, from the completion of higher education, to the wait of developing a family, only to become the glue that holds the family together. Not only do women have to mentally wait on the goals and aims of life, they are mindful of how well they carry themselves. After becoming incorporated in 1913, Alpha Kappa Alpha branched out all over by a selected college-trained women improved the social and economic conditions in their city, state, nation and the world. Today there are over 140,000 women who are members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. and its 860 chapters.Aretina Young was given the task of recognition of guests. The Nu Rho chapter from UNCG was in attendance as well as an A&T alumna. Ms. Gabbin, a member of the Sigma Gamma Omega chapter of AKA Sorority Inc., said “it feels nice to come home to see everyone.” There was also representation from The Beta Epsilon chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., the Alpha Nu chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., the Eta chapter of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc., and the Alpha Mu chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.Other sororities celebrating their founding are:Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., Feb. 13.Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc., Jan. 16. Sigma Gamma Rho, Nov. 12.

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SGA hires new VP of external affairs

After a quick two-week search the N.C. A&T Senate of the Student Government Association (SGA) has found a replacement in the vice president of external affairs position in John L. Everett IV.Everett was selected from 16 different candidates and was named to the position on Feb. 6. Rashawn Henderson, member of the elections committee, said that after several interviews and several great answers from Everett, the senate thought that he was the man for the job.”The senate concluded that he (Everett) displayed wonderful leadership qualities,” said Henderson. “His main focus was A&T and he was in tune with the issues that surrounded the SGA.”The search for a new vice president of external affairs began when Chester Williams stepped down from the position and left the university, according to William Dudley, vice president of internal affairs.”The decision was made by the senate but the Application Confirmation Committee gives the recommendation for who they think should hold a particular office,” said Dudley. “The main idea was to get someone with experience with either this SGA or another, and John had that experience.”Everett, a Huntsville, Ala. native, is a transfer student from Kentucky State University and will be graduating in May with a double major in mechanical engineering at A&T and a degree applied math with a minor in physics at Kentucky State.Everett explained that he plans to do many things in his new position despite only three months left in the semester.”My main priority is to get SGA closer to the students,” said Everett. “I want to help get rid of the negativity surrounding the SGA. I’m in this office to give the students what they want. The satisfaction of the students is first and foremost my goal.”When asked if he thought he could fill the shoes of Williams, who SGA President Greg Drumwright called one of the hardest working in SGA, Everett said with no hesitation, “Yes.””I most definitely am able to do this kind of job,” he said. “I’ve worked with the SGA before, just not at A&T (referring to his work at Kentucky State). I know that it takes a certain level of dedication and responsibility. But I am more than qualified to do it.”SGA members were said to have opened Everett with open arms and are in anticipation for the projects that he has to assume. The biggest one: AggieFest.”Planning AggieFest is one of my biggest projects this semester,” said Everett. “I definitely want to get the students involved in the planning process. Their input is valuable to me, and it allows me to see what they want and gives me the chance to get the best quality entertainers for our university.”I know that there is work to be done, and I plan to work diligently to accomplish the things that I said I would.”Other projects that Everett plans to implement in the remaining months of the semester is to work with the area high school students on Black College Day on March 20. His goal is to inform high school students about the advantage of going to an HBCU.The process of hiring Everett was strenuous, according to the senior. The most challenging part about it, said Everett, was not knowing what to expect, stating that “the anticipation was the worst part.”Dudley spoke highly of Everett’s work ethic.”There’s a diligence that I’ve seen in him to tackle all the responsibilities of his position and that’s satisfying to see,” said Dudley. “He has the backing of the SGA. Anything that he wants to accomplish he’ll have our support.”

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20 Questions

1. Aren’t we all proud of the new “A&T Four” statue in front of the Dudley Building?2. Aren’t we glad that they’re finally passing out new IDs?3. If your ID is broken into two or more pieces, do you still have to turn it in?4. What’s up with Ford not making the “Escort” anymore?5. Don’t we all know somebody that drives a red or hunter green Escort (with rims)?6. Does “Free” ( from 106 & Park) ever wear sneakers?7. Shouldn’t we all be worrying about loving ourselves first…rather then everybody else on Valentine’s Day?8. Once again….why is it that nobody wants you until you’re with somebody else?9. Signs that you got played for Valentine’s Day A. He or She walked right past you and didn’t speak when you saw them Monday…even after you called their name. B. They gave you their e-mail address instead of their phone number. C. Every time his or her friends see you…they bust out laughing.10. Why do some single people hate on couples during Valentine’s Day?11. Aren’t these the same people who make everybody sick when they get somebody?12. Why do some couples front like they’re so “in love” just because it’s Valentine’s Day?13. Signs that you’re in a troubled relationship A. Everybody (even people you don’t know) keep telling you to break up with him or her. B. You spent Valentine’s Day with someone else, on purpose. C. Everything they say or do gets on your nerves.14. Who do we need to thank for opening up that parking lot in front of Haley?15. When is “Body Ecology” (downtown) going to open back up?16. Whatever happened to “class meetings” (Freshmen, Sophomore, etc.)?17. Don’t we hope R. Kelly was smart enough not to get caught on that videotape? 18. Is anybody (with things to do)… watching the Winter Olympics?19. Why do people park their cars on the construction site in front of Haley?20. Wouldn’t they be really upset if a bulldozer backed over their car?

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Renick named to serve on HBCU board

Dr. James C. Renick, chancellor of N.C. A&T, has been selected by President George W. Bush to serve on the President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Renick is one of 21 individuals selected to the commission. Board members were sworn in at a ceremony Feb. 12 during the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities National Conference in Washington, D.C.”This appointment is as much about A&T as it is about me,” said Renick. “A&T has represented so much for so many for so long. The university has a national standing and people recognize the role that the university plays in a national way.”The President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities advises the president and the secretary of education on issues related to strengthening and advancing HBCU’s.Board membership is composed of education and corporate leaders from across the nation. Bernard Joseph Milano, president of the KPMG Foundation in Montvale, N.J., and chair of the advisory board for the A&T School of Business and Economics was also appointed to the board.A&T is the No. 1 producer of minorities with degrees in science, mathematics, engineering and technology.Renick was inducted as chancellor April 20, 2000. He said, “The future belongs to those institutions that have the foresight, energy, creativity, wisdom and courage to understand that their destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice and will to achieve.”Also in his inagural address Renick quoted Dr. Martin Luther King in stating why A&T can’t wait to move into the future.

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Allen Payne gives insite to the question and play “Why Men Cry in the Dark”

Take a seat, don’t bring refreshments and turn off all cell phones as you prepare for the hit play “Men Cry in the Dark.”The play, based on Michael Baisden’s book, ran a preview run at the Greensboro Coliseum Jan. 19-21. Derrick Reed, who is the publisher for “Happily Single’s” magazine, was portrayed by Allen Payne, who has starred in movies such as “The Perfect Storm,” “Jason’s Lyric,” “The Walking Dead” and BET’s original movie “Commitments.” Not forgetting his role as “G Money” in “New Jack City” and regular roles on the “The Cosby Show” and “A Different World.”The play also stars Rhona Bennett, Richard Roundtree, R&B singer Monifah and Jay Delay.The set design featured a projection screen to add flavor to certain scenes of the play, which was also very creative. The stage setup consisted of silver bars on the top level of Derrick’s apartment. The bars also linked to stairs that dropped down into the living room. During some scenes, a movable radio station obscured the kitchen and you immediately felt like one of the callers on a live radio talk show. The overall setting represented Derrick’s bachelor-type crib. There were leather couches, crimson silk curtains, flowers, coffee tables and also a view of the city. The show opens with Derrick and his father discussing the reason why Derrick quit his job. Throughout the production, Derrick constantly tries to convince his father that “Happily Single” is a wonderful opportunity for him and his career. Regardless of Derrick and his father’s disagreement over career goals, his father looked into his heart and comforted him when it came to women.Derrick goes though the next struggle on air with different women while promoting his magazine. The topic on air is “Why Do Men Cheat?” When he starts the conversation off with “Men cheat because women allow them to,” everything hits the fan. Well, that is until “Ms. Westside” turns his world upside down.The biggest struggle, however, was not Angela, his father or his friends. “The Clean Up Woman” that portrayed to be Angela’s dear friend was Derrick’s weakness.She stirs up trouble all over the place. Her character received a lot of “ooh’s and ahh’s” as she proved to be confident in her trap for Derrick. The biggest scene that caught my attention was when Derrick’s friend Mark came to rescue Derrick from his depression. Mark went into his crib and treated him like a good friend should. He cleaned up his crib, helped him up and gave him a lecture. The song titled, “Go and Get Your Lady” got the crowd really into it. He sung his heart out and picked up Derrick’s things. He placed them in Derrick’s hands and opened the door so that he could handle business and get his woman back a positive way. Do men really go though emotional damage? To each his own with that question, but at least I know now that there is a possibility that some men do suffer as much as some women. I think that the production did an outstanding job of depicting the book. “The difference between doing shows and doing theater is…[the] medium,” said Payne. “The hardest role I ever had to prepare for was “The Perfect Storm.” Payne’s next project is a movie titled “Thirty Years to Life.”Delay plans to do theater for a while, and possibly film.”It wasn’t hard working on this play because I am doing what I do,” said Delay. The show hits major cities across the country. Remaining tour dates are online at www.lovelustlies.com.

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The Lady Aggies stun the Rattlers, earning their first win of the season.

It may have taken 20 games and the firing of the head coach, but the Lady Aggies have finally cracked the win column. On Feb. 9 at the Corbett Sports Center, the Lady Aggies stunned the Rattlers of Florida A&M, beating them 54-53 for their first win of the season. Camille Akins, who scored 19 points and grabbed three rebounds, led the way for the Lady Aggies. The Lady Aggies only scored 17 points in the first half, trailing 18-17, but turned it around by scoring 37 second-half points. The Lady Aggies shot only 31.3 percent from the field for the game and were outrebounded 48-38, but they found a way to win. The defense came up big as they forced the Rattlers into 26 turnovers and 39.6 percent shooting from the field and caused havoc throughout the game.At game’s end, the lethargic crowd who viewed the Lady Aggie basketball game burst into joy as the buzzer sounded and the scoreboard showed a 54-53 win for the Aggies. Kim Watson led the Rattlers with 17 points and nine rebounds, while Akins and Davenna Brown combined for 34 points for the Aggies. The win gave A&T a record of 1-19 overall and 1-12 in the MEAC while the Rattlers fell to 8-13 overall and 4-8 in the MEAC.

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Aggies hold off Rattlers, 81-73

The N.C. A&T Aggies continued their torrid late-season run on Feb. 9 as they held on to defeat the Rattlers of Florida A&M by a score of 81-73 at the Corbett Sports Center. Bruce Jenkins paced the Aggies as he scored 26 points and grabbed 11 rebounds while Marque Carrington added 15 points, six assists and three steals. The Rattlers fell behind 44-28 at the half but rallied to make a game of it in the second half. However, the Aggies hit 32 of 45 free throws, including 13 of 16 by Carrington to ice the game. Also, A&T dished out 17 assists as a team while Florida A&M had only one.

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