Letter to the Editor

As a journalist, an unbiased opinion is imperative to report the truth to your readers. Without this virtue, often the truth is lost in a sea of propaganda and rhetoric.In the article “Crowned in SGA” by T.J. Moore, the facts about the race for the crown of Miss A&T were snowed over with opinion and conjecture. As a faithful reader of The Register, I expect to be informed with accurate information, not the opinions of an ambitious writer. If the article is based merely on the opinion of the writer, then I expect to see it in the opinion section of the paper, and not plastered across the front page. First of all, the fact that I am a proud member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. has nothing to do with the fact that I sought the crown of Miss A&T. Though it was her perogative to state the facts that she deemed necessary in her article, I question the motive and appropriateness of Moore in including the title “Delta Sigma Theta member” with my name. Other candidates for executive offices who are members of Greek organizations were not labeled as I was. Furthermore, there were many extenuating circumstances and controversies surrounding this election, which may have influenced the voters that the public is not aware of. For example, in the initial article written by Moore introducing the candidates running for executive offices in SGA, it was stated that I could not be reached for an interview at print time. This is an untruth. There is no proof that any attempt was made to contact me before the printing of this article. My interview was printed only after I contacted the editor…even then, it was hidden within another article, which had nothing to do with the Miss A&T election. Please do not misread my intentions. This letter is not a ranting from a bitter loser, but an expression of concern and disappointment from a reader who ardently believes that “The Register” has been in the past, and should continue to be a neutral and informative voice for the students of N.C. A&T. Of course, I am naturally disappointed at my loss. However, I believe that in life we reap what we sow. I wish Brooke Myatt all of the happiness and success in life and as Miss A&T that she deserves. And to Moore, I sincerely hope that there was no intention of malice on your behalf, and I wish you my sincerest best wishes in your endeavors as a writer. I will conclude by stating that The Register is a powerful force within the A&T community, and I hope that this power will be used in the future to inform and enlighten the Aggie family, and not spread hearsay.

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Cafeteria almost set to open for next year

Williams Cafeteria has a new look and new features that will surely have students proud of their Café.Renovation costs for Williams Cafeteria were $10.1 million and included the replacement of the heating and air conditioning system, expanding the footprint of the building 30 percent to increase overall seating capacity to 1,000, equipping the facility with an audio/video system that includes video monitors and surround sound and installing wireless networking capabilities.”The exterior was renovated and enhanced to create a better dining experience and ambience,” said Todd Johnson, director of auxiliary services. “This was accomplished by opening the building and making a glass picture storefront that overlooks the Holland Bowl.” On the inside, Williams Cafeteria will feature a new food court that will house restaurant chains Pizza Hut and Krispy Kreme. There will also an Aggie Gift shop on the first floor that will sale A&T and Greek paraphernalia.Also on the first floor are the Chancellor’s Dining Area, which will be used for chancellor-hosted events, a specialty dining area that will serve as a location for catered events, as well as a dining area for faculty and staff and a student carryout area.The main dining area for students is located on the second floor and will have a variety of dining stations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner stations will include a southern-style breakfast, traditional home style, American grill, stir fry, deli and soup bar, pasta and potato bar, a “thirst base” with a full selection of beverages and a bakery and dessert bar. There will also be an Aggie fruit and salad bar that will feature over 20 items.”In terms of a primary dining facility, our new Williams Cafeteria will rank among leading colleges and universities in terms of what a facility can offer,” said Johnson.Meal plans for next semester have also been revised to provide more flexibility to students with busy schedules. “Rather than limiting the number of meals per week, students will be able to eat anywhere using their flex dollars,” said Johnson.”Flex” dollars are assigned to each meal plan and are similar to having a declining balance. The amount of “flex” dollars a student has will vary from plan to plan. If student has a balance remaining after the fall semester, the balance will roll over to the spring semester, but there will be no refunds for a remaining balance at the end of the spring semester.Here is a look at the new meal plan with “flex” dollars:Meal Plan A: 19 meals per week, plus $100 Aggie flex dollarsMeal Plan B: 14 meals per week, plus $200 Aggie flex dollars.Meal Plan C: Seven meals per week, plus $200 Aggie flex dollarsThe cost of each meal plan will also increase to support the new facility. Plans to open the new cafeteria are set for early to mid-June, with a formal opening in August. “Plans, due to the number of students on meal plans for summer school, are to open the second floor to accommodate summer school and freshman orientation, then to open the first floor as it’s completed in mid- to late-summer,” said Johnson.

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Zetas present a week dedicated to womanhood

The ladies of the Zeta Alpha Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. presented a week of womanhood on the campus of N.C. A&T, April 22-25. The activities were planned to give the campus experiences both entertaining and educational.On Monday in the Stallings Ballroom, a session on The Lessons of a Lady was presented by Bettie Ray (Zeta Spring 2002). She taught the ladies in attendance the proper way to act in different environments as well as the proper dress code for different occasions. Professionalism was one of the main topics that Ray focused on.Sisterhood is one of the principles of the sorority; therefore the program on “Sisterly Love” could not have been more appropriate. What is true sisterhood was one of the topics discussed in this session. At the session there were members represented from all of the fraternities and sororities on campus, thus the topic of Greek unity became the discussion of the session.On Wednesday, the fight was on for the Battle of the Sexes. This gave both sexes the chance to express their views on sex, interracial dating and other topics relating to relationships. Not only did the ladies battle through discussion, they played in the first annual Greek Basketball Games, and came out the overall winners for the sororities. The week of entertainment concluded with a session called Blue Ice. This was co-hosted by the brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. with the Zetas as an open mic session. This gave all that were in attendance a chance to express the way they felt about any subject matter. The events for this week were the idea and the work of the new inductees of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. line of spring 2002. “The idea for the sorority next year is to plan events with other campus organization, and show we as Aggies will come forth in unity,” said Rhonda Fedrick, a Zeta spring 2002 inductee.

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A&T quizzers finish sixth

N.C. A&T’s quiz bowl team finished the year in the top six at the Honda Quiz Bowl tournament, April 4-8 in Orlando, Fla. Each year 64 HBCUs go to battle with a buzzer in hand to discover the most intelligent collegiate team. Although Quiz Bowl is not highly recognized by the student body, the faculty and its participants deem it worthy of being classified as a sport. “It’s a high-profile sport on a different level than athletics,” said Ralph Brown, Quiz Bowl coordinator. The team composed of all different majors and ethnic groups ranked 10 places higher this year than in former years. The secret weapon was a tight friendship, according to team captain George McHugh. Many hours of practicing in the library added to the ammunition. Varsity team members Jonathan Rosero, Antoine Harris, Derrick Ware, George McHugh and William Griffin were known for practicing for hours in the library along with the junior varsity team members Jacinta Simmons, Haile Lindsay, Justin Bullock, Jermelle Jordan and Jemeika Sampson. “The team normally puts in seven to eight hours a week but individually we may put in a little more,” said McHugh. As a freshman in search of chicken in the Student Union, junior marketing major Derrick Ware did not know he would end up with the team.”I just smelled some chicken. I was hungry. When I found out where the smell was coming from I ran upon a quiz bowl scrimmage and was asked to give it a try. I’ve been affiliated with the quiz bowl team ever since,” said Ware.Over the last 10 to 15 years quiz bowl called many different departments home, but it has primarily resided in the hands of student affairs.Every year student affairs hosts a campus tournament seeking out new team members. Through a process of elimination in about three rounds, five students out of 40 are chosen to represent A&T in the regional in hopes to go on to the national tournament.”The biggest thing is making it available for these guys,” said Brown. “A lot of times we ask sororities, fraternities and other student organizations to send some people over to a scrimmage.”Team members admit that a lot of students are interested in quiz bowl once they hear about the perks. Over the recent years quiz bowl teams have traveled to Orlando, Fla., for the national tournament and have received A&T paraphernalia. “We get a lot of perks and recognition from the faculty, but the thing I value most is the friendship and comradory. I got a chance to meet and bond with people that I probably would have never met otherwise because we all have different majors and are from different places,” said Ware.For more information about Quiz Bowl, contact student affairs at 334-7676 or visit the Student Union.

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MOM-O leader teams with A&T to fight murders and violence

In conjunction with the N.C. A&T Domestic Violence Program, the Sociology and Social Work Society presented “Beyond the Pain,” a special appearance April 12 by Dee Sumpter, co-founder of Mothers of Murdered Offspring (MOM-O). This year’s conference was entitled Families Locked in a Violent Embrace: New Keys to Unlock the Trama; “How Many Times.”Each year the Domestic Violence Program organizes a conference designed to examine the faces of violence and its effects on society and this year Sumpter was invited to tell the inspirational story of the movement that resulted from her daughter’s death.Sumpter found her daughter, Shawna D. Hawk, murdered in her family’s home in Charlotte on Feb. 19, 1993. She and Hawk’s boyfriend found the young woman dead in the bathtub after being raped, strangled, sodomized and brutally murdered. At the time, Hawk was an aspiring paralegal student at a local community college and the only daughter and second of four children. In March of 1993, the family and friends of Hawk founded MOM-O. The organization provides support to mothers and families that have experienced the loss of a loved one to murder.Sumpter reflected on how she is still coping with the loss of her daughter and how she has found the strength to move on with her life beyond the pain.”Every time I hear that story I have to think to myself, is it really Shawna, my baby,” said Sumpter. “It is an ongoing effort picking up the pieces of my life.”During the time after Hawk was murdered Sumpter felt as though the Charlotte police were not working to their full capability to find the murderer.Vowed to find the killer of her daughter, she held a press conference at the community college her daughtter attended and read a letter to the killer, one year after the horrific murder.After the press conference, serial killer Henry L. Wallace would strike again. Eleven other women were killed by Wallace before he was arrested.Angela Henderson, vice president of the Sociology and Social Work Society, says was excited about Sumpter’s visit and hopes that the student body will continue to support her.”We wanted everybody to hear her message. Her essence is so beautiful that it is able to touch lives and get through to them (those who attend) and also bring strength and encouragement into their lives,” said Henderson.Henderson and a friend decided to invite Sumpter to the conference after seeing her win the Humanitarian Award at the 2001 Essence Awards on television.The Sociology and Social Work Society also decided to collaborate with the Domestic Violence Program in order to reach out beyond students, but to faculty, staff and the community as well.”We wanted everyone to be there in support of each other and to be able to embrace and empathize with the different issues in our society among African-Americans and people as a whole,” said Henderson. Sumpter spoke in the Stallings Memorial Ballroom where other seminars and workshops for this year’s conference were held. Other guest speakers included Dr. Tricia B. Bent-Goodley, assistant professor at Howard University School of Social Work and Rev. Aubra Love, founding director of the Black Church and Domestic Violence Institute in Atlanta. For more information about the N.C. A&T Domestic Violence Program or future conferences contact program coordinator Dr. Joyce Dickerson, Tammy Williams or Chauncey Greene, intern coordinators at (336) 334-3884 or (336) 334-7894 or e-mail dickersj@ncat.edu. For more information about MOM-O visit the website, www.momounderstands.com

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Leaving hard to cope with for some seniors

College is the only place that gives you the excitement of coming in and the excitement of getting out.And for some N.C. A&T seniors the road less traveled is harder to leave than expected. For many, college is where it all began, from the drama of relationships to the stress over midterms and finals. Even the long lines in the financial aid office and the constant runarounds from different administrators that send students into a state of rage seem forgotten by some seniors as they get ready to take the plunge into the “real world” where bills must be paid and a job maintained. All of that can be placed aside “just as long as I graduate,” said Denise McClean, a graduating graphics communications major. “It’s been tough, but it doesn’t look so bad once you get that diploma in your hand,” she said. “It kind of makes it easy to forget, or should I say over look.”For Phillip Mark, a graduating accounting major, leaving isn’t as easy as he thought it would be. “You think that when the time comes to leave you’ll be so ready,” said Mark. “And though I’m ready to start my career it’s a little difficult to say goodbye to all the people I’ve met and all the experiences I’ve been through.”Mark just recently became a member of the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., which he considers to be one of his best college experiences.The class of 2002 has its own identity according to Mark. He believes that the class getting ready to face the world is more prepared than any other.”Oh, this class is unique not simply because I’m in it, but because each and every person getting out has more wisdom and more strength than they did when they came in,” he said.But what is it about colleges or universities that just have students drooling to get in, and once in, drooling to get out?Is it the work? What about the people or the professors? Could it be that they aren’t ready for it?According to Dr. Teresa Styles, “They experience the real world in college, and the real world isn’t always pretty. In fact, it’s hardly ever pretty.”Styles also said that students often come to college with an unrealistic approach.”It’s about fun and it’s about new experiences, but the truth about college is that you can’t have too much fun and you have to be responsible,” she said. “If you don’t you’ll just be another somebody that came to A&T and didn’t finish.”The class of 2002 more than understands that as some can look back and say, “Wow, I actually made it.” In fact, those were the exact words of graduating senior Jamar Phelps, an architecture engineer major.”It’s been tough, ’cause I did have a little too much fun, but I settled down because I had to and I wanted to graduate,” said Phelps.So, will these graduating seniors miss the hustle and bustle of college life, or will they just simply let it go and embrace the next challenge or experience in their lives?Some would say they’ll remember now but in a few years it will be a distant memory, sort of like high school. But others would say that this (college) experience is one that is never forgotten but always remembered. Despite the trials, graduating makes it all worth it.The fact of the matter is graduating is an accomplishment. Although it’s hard to leave, no one has a problem doing it.

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A&T Cribs

Greg Drumwright, 2001-2002 SGA president, cordially allowed A&T Cribs a peek into his presidential suite at Barbee Hall. When you first walk into the renovated office-turned-suite, you are paraded through a plethora of blue and gold. His walls are two-toned in blue and gold with additional crown molding. Accenting his living room is a plush gold loveseat with prominent blue patterned pillows and a blue couch with decorative gold pillows. The president commented that the loveseat/couch combination equaled about $8,000. This is probably because the furniture is so rare that the only other two were reportedly in the possession of Michael Jordan and Steven Spielberg. With an Aggie mural over the loveseat you can make a quick assumption what the theme of the room is, right? Aggie Pride! Gold curtains with blue trim also cost an estimated $5,000, Drumwright said. He pointed out that money for the brand-new suite did not come from the SGA, but from an allocated fund for the presidential living quarters. In his small but quaint kitchen, a small dining table with accompanying chairs sit adjacent to the entrance with a tiger skin rug resting beneath the table.”I brought that rug with me back from Africa,” Drumwright said proudly. His bedroom was neat, organized and almost seemed a tad bit too bland considering the rest of the suite. His personalized comforter set rested on a full/queen size sleigh bed and his closet walls displayed shopping bags from his favorite merchants such as Banana Republic and Tommy Hilifiger to give the room a personal touch. A quick peek in the bathroom shows what one may have expected: clean and personalized. His blue shower curtains displayed his name in gold cursive letters along with several hand towels and washcloths set out for decoration. The tour doesn’t stop here, however. The president allowed a sneak peek into his private office at Vanstory Hall. Drumwright said that the apartment was his gift to the next president.

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Residents strengthen economy

Many Greensboro residents and businesses are optimistic about the country’s economic futureIt is definite that the effects of Sept. 11 continue to haunt the economy of the United States.Though experts say we are climbing out of a recession and are on our way to a heightened recovery, employment rates remain at an all-time low.Figures from the U.S. Labor Department show that the number of people making new employment claims grew to a seasonally adjusted 460,000 in the week ending March 30. However, a spokesman for the department says that layoffs in the aftermath of the terror attacks inflated those figures and they will remain distorted for a few weeks to come.As for Greensboro, employment rates remain at somewhat of a standstill with few new hires and many layoffs. City officials say Greensboro may be forced to raise property taxes this summer, due to a series of economic blows.So what does this mean for the city’s residents?Aside from a slowly recovering economy, entrepreneur Jay Maxwell is in the midst of opening up a new business.Currently Maxwell works as a barber in a local shop on Greensoboro’s eastside. As he cut the hair of his regular customers, he reflected on his thoughts about his profesion and the economy.”People are going to always need a haircut,” said Maxwell. “As for now, I feel as though I’m in a safe profession.”Maxwell has been looking forward to opening his own business since he began his professional career as a barber 15 years ago.His barbershop, Hairballz, is set to open in mid-May on Spring Garden Street.”It (opening a business) has been a dream of mine since I used to cut hair as a young boy and I’ve been saving up for it since about ’95,” said Maxwell.Maxwell hopes his central location near the city’s largest universities and also residential neighborhoods will help to expand his business.”I plan on having a very laid-back atmosphere different from many existing barbershops in the area. I will offer things that many of them don’t, including a hairball mascot, Irvy,” said Maxwell.Maxwell is one of a strengthened majority of Greensboro residents that are optimistic about the future of the city’s economy.”At this point, according to the historical pattern since World War II, we are in the usual pattern for unemployment after coming out of a recession,” said Dr. Larry Morse, associate professor of economics at N.C. A&T State University.Though many of the city’s businesses have made necessary changes, the Dana plant of Whitsett recently announced it would change the employee roster by laying off more than 25 percent of its work force. In June the company, which currently makes axle parts for SUVs, will lay off 100 of about 370 workers.Melvin King works for the Dana plant and is trying to keep positive thoughts as the uncertainties about his company have been revealed.”I’m trying to stay positive about everything because I do have a family,” said King.”I also have a new house so the last thing I want to think about is being laid off.”With recent talks of government cutbacks, it may not seem like the United States is headed for better days, but in the hearts and the minds of some Greensboro residents, seeing a united community is providing them with enough reassurance.”I know that the economy will definitely get better in time,” said junior lab animal science major Sesha Jackson. “Sept. 11 was rough on the entire nation, but it also showed that we can come together in times of need. That’s important as we improve our economy,” she said.

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20 Questions

By Dijon RolleRegister Contributor1. What is the difference between a hotel and a motel?2. Who is going to write these questions when I graduate?3. How many times are they going to work on the server?4. Are you country if you drive with your arm hangin’ out the window?5. Does anybody still tell “momma” jokes?6. It’s almost time for school to be out when….A. Nobody brings any books to class.B. You wait to the last minute to do everything,C. You can’t find the parking space you want, so you just go home.D. Standing outside for no reason doesn’t sound so bad.7. Things we don’t want to see at graduationA. Happy families broken up over who can and can’t come to graduation.B. People marching with “busted” dress shoes on.C. People with nothing on under their gowns.D. Advisors pullin’ folks out of line on May 11th.8. How many of us knew that “Cricket” was the official cell phone provider for A&T?9. Why are there so many potholes between Haley Hall and Corbett?10. How many times has your car almost fallen in one of them?11. Does anybody eat at that pizza place in the union?12. Who keeps putting those chairs on the edge of the fountain by the union?13. Are we ever going to get the Wall Street Journal back in Merrick?14. Or are they just all gone before we get there?15. How do they pick the people to be on the front of A&T’s brochures?16. How you ever seen these people walking around on campus?17. Do they even go here…really?18. Is it really hot enough for people to be wearing straw hats already?19. Are cornrows ever gonna go out of style?20. After we graduate, are we really grown?

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Jackson Jr. to speak at graduation

Representative Jesse Jackson Jr. will be the keynote speaker at N.C. A&T’s 111th Annual Commencement, 9 a.m. Saturday, May 11, at the Greensboro Coliseum. Jackson, the son of A&T alumni Jesse Jackson Sr., received his bachelor’s degree in business management from A&T in 1987. He then went on to earn his master’s in arts degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary and his doctorate from the University of Illinois College of Law.Jackson moved his way up the legal ladder and landed a spot in the United States House of Representatives on Dec. 12, 1995. Jackson is currently serving on the Subcommittee on Labor, House of Appropriations Committee, Health and Human Services and Education, Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, Export Finance and other related programs. Since being involved in legislation, Jackson has addressed health care needs to underserved communities by leading the successful effort to establish the Center of Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institututes of Health. He has also co-authored two books with his father, “Legal Lynching” and “It’s About The Money.” “The size of the graduating class is approximately 900 students,” said Deborah Livingston, assistant registrar. “This is relatively the same size as most graduating classes we have here at A&T.” Upcoming graduating students at A&T are inspired by Jackson’s appearance. “It is good to know that an alumni from A&T who rose to the top, is coming back to A&T to give the graduates pearls of wisdom,” said Tammy Giles. “Although I am not graduating from A&T this year, it shows me that A&T alumni don’t forget where they came from and give back to the institution that gave them a future.”All students participating in the spring 2002 commencement must line up at the Coliseum at 8 a.m. The processional will then be given at 8:30 a.m., and the ceremony will begin shortly thereafter.Rehearsal for graduation is 10 a.m. May 10 in Harrison Auditorium.

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Saying goodbye is never easy

It’s been four years of trials and triumphs and I loved every bit of it (wow, this is going to be tougher than I thought). From freshman to senior. From boy to man. The journey of college has been an adventure. There’s so much I’m going to miss about A&T. Surprisingly, I’m going to miss the Café. Not the food, but the people I met there, the friendships that were established. I’ll never forget the first time I ate in the café. It was an experience that left me in the hospital overnight because I had food poisoning. That was not cool, but when I look back on it I say to myself, “That’s what college is all about.” Going through the ills and spills and becoming a better person because of that. But all my experiences at A&T weren’t like my very first one in the café. Some of my experiences have been really memorable, and I know you guys don’t want to read this but I wouldn’t be a senior if I didn’t take a trip down memory lane a few weeks before graduation. Life is outrageous, man. You just keep getting older (something I don’t like but will live with) and you just keep leaving other people behind. You build relationships just to say goodbye to them someday. And though you’ll remember the person or persons it’s just not the same. It hurts leaving others behind, especially when you really don’t think you can make it without them. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned at A&T it’s that Aggie relationships never die. I love A&T, but I love the people I’ve met more.To The Register staff: You all will never know how much I love you, and will miss you. Man, for three years we’ve scratched, crawled and stood tall against all the trials. The road has not been easy but we made it, and we’ll continue to make it. I may be gone in flesh, but I’ll always be there in spirit. Just put a big 20×24 poster of me in the office and it’ll be just like I never left. Ms. Nieman, thank you for caring. Thank you for the yelling, too. Just playing. Val (I’ve always wanted to call you that now I get my chance), you’re remarkable. You’re better than you give yourself credit for. Without you The Register wouldn’t be the same. Thank you again. I just don’t have the words to say what I feel, but I do want you to know that I love you. You’re special to me far beyond your knowledge. Chris “Hollywood” Wallace, you are my boy! We came to The Register the same year and we went through the motions and everything else. You have so much potential, Chris. It’s amazing to see how you’ve grown as a person and as a friend. We’ve been through much (remember your freshman year?). Chris, don’t ever sell yourself short of reaching your goals. With your leadership and with Christ you can’t go wrong. Just use wisdom in all your decision-making. I love you, man.Tarah Holland a.k.a. The Beast. You know you are my girl. I am going to miss you like crazy. I look forward to going to The Register just to see your big head and laugh at you. Yeah, this is payback for all your smart comments. By the way, please do something about the breath. You’ll never find a man with breath like yours. Sorry, it’s the truth. But for real. Tarah, you have a natural gift in writing and editing, use it. You have leadership and creativity, use it. You’re blessed, Tarah, and I love you for being dedicated to your work and always being consistent.T.J. Moore, life (and this is the truth) will never be the same without you. You’re a beautiful person and I hope you see what I see and what everyone else sees in you someday. Don’t stop going until you get what you want, and when you get it send me $200.Jason Boyd, bro you’ve been a lifesaver time after time after time. You got skills, man. I know you’ll be the president of some Fortune 500 company someday and you won’t forget about your old editor in college. Please make the check out to Randy St.Clair not Sinclair. Mad love, bro.Last but most certainly not least. Sharonda Eggleton, I am going to miss the mess out of you. You’re so special to me. I thank God for placing you in my life. You’ll forever be my little sis. Thank you for putting up with my demands and doing things even when you don’t want to. You too have been a lifesaver. I love you with all my heart.Well, that’s it. You won’t see my face in The Register any more after this, unless I become chancellor someday (watch out Chancellor Renick). Let me just leave you with this: A wise man once told me that life without challenges is life without growth. Don’t ever quit Aggies. P.S. There is no wise man. I just thought I’d try to get deep on ya’ll :).

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Vivual/Performing Arts recieve new leadership along with Lyceum Series fame

At the turn of the fall semester, Dr. Michael Caldwell was recently named the chairperson of Visual and Performing Arts. According to Caldwell, the department is a fusion of dance, music, theater and visual arts. “I am very excited about the program because it offers so many options that are consistent with future directions that the university plans to take,” he added. Caldwell also has hopes that the department can add new courses, degrees, grants and partnerships to its already-growing programs.”We have fabulous professors and parts of the unit are globally oriented. We also have students doing wonderful things,” Caldwell said. “Some of our visual arts students traveled to Washington, D.C., and Maryland visiting Howard and the University of Maryland graduate schools. Also our E. Gwynn Dancers have also traveled internationally,” he added.As the year progresses, the department and Dr. Caldwell are constantly coming up with new ideas and new projects for students to partake.The department of Visual and Performing Arts also takes part in the university’s annual Lyceum Series. Caldwell, who is also co-chairperson of the Lyceum committee, said, “This year’s series entitled, “Timeless Truths, Unforgettable Visions,’ tries to represent all art through a broad selection of experiences.” “The Meeting,” an acclaimed play written by Jeff Stetson, is among the various events headlining the series, and will show Feb. 21, at 8 p.m. in the Robeson Theater. The play, directed by Ralph Paul Thomason, portrays what might have happened at an undisclosed meeting held by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X in February of 1965. Performances in the Lyceum Series began Oct. 28 with a one-woman show on Sojourner Truth, and will continue through the spring.

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