Fashion troupes seek new spirit of unity

The word on campus is that members of Couture modeling troupe ridiculed a Verge model during a performance for the Mr. Aggie Pageant in Harrison Auditorium.

Uncategorized

Opinion: In Brief

Around 9 p.m. Tuesday, four teenagers and a 20-year-old wrecked near the Deep River bridge on Walker Mill Road in Randolph County after state troopers said the car slammed into the guard rail and rolled off the bridge into the river. The 17-year-old driver lost control of the car while speeding.

Uncategorized

Election day is coming, Have you registered?

The 15th and 19th Amendments grant each citizen regardless of race, sex or creed the right to vote. The 26th Amendment allows citizens 18 years of age and older to vote. However, even with these amendments guaranteeing young people the vote, many have yet to allow their voices to be heard.

Uncategorized

Africa’s problems are addressed by Africans

The challenge in really comfortable hotels is not to get too comfortable. The soft chairs swaddle you, suggesting sleep; the plush curtains and thick windows muffle all the helpful noise that might jolt you back to consciousness. But Thabo Mbeki is unbowed. He sits upright in his chair, defying pillow mechanics; he radiates a lively charm, even though his minders warned that the South African president was exhausted. He achieves all this, moreover, while holding forth on subjects that would put lesser men out cold. The U.N. General Assembly, for example. Or the contribution of proportional representation to democracy in Lesotho. Mbeki is expounding on a theme that mirrors, in a curious way, his posture in New York’s Waldorf Astoria. He’s summoning up the spirit of the anti-apartheid era, the long struggle against rich white dominance of Africa. That struggle, he believes, continues in another form: the battle against the soporific, plush-pillow embrace of well-meaning white experts.

Uncategorized

End profiling, start educating

It’s a year after Sept. 11 and there is no doubt that the the results of the cowardly terror attacks on our nation continue to have a lasting impression in our minds and in our hearts.

Uncategorized

Abuse happens all over

Why have we all been so fascinated by Madelyne Gorman Toogood, the hapless mother who was caught on video as she beat her child in an Indiana parking lot?

Uncategorized

What’s happening around the Triad

CELEBRATE THE REOPENING OF THE DUDLEY BUILDING and open house, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 2. The event will feature tours of the H.C. Taylor Art Gallery and the Mattye Reed Art Gallery.

Uncategorized

Scream 2 Tour

RALEIGH – Bow Wow, B2K and IMX know how to please the ladies in their “Scream 2 Tour.” I think that every one between the ages of five and 35 were screaming to the top of their lungs during the show.

Uncategorized

Mr. Aggie reigns

The 22nd Annual Mr. Aggie Pageant titled “Invasion of a Sophisticated Aggie Man,” sparked up Aggie pride among most N.C. A&T students in attendance.At the pageant Monday, Sept. 23, in Harrison Auditorium, greetings along with rules and regulations were offered by April Moore followed by a prayer by Student Union Activities Board President Raynard Sumpter.After the prayer the N.C. A&T Gospel Choir sang the school’s Alma Mater , getting A&T students on their feet to show their respect and admiration for A&T.The rest of the show was fueled by performances from new gospel sensation Steven McQueen, who performed his hit single “God Is Love,” and the all-girl group Godly Essence got the crowd hyped with a rendition of “You Made My Day,” which seemed to get the crowd even more rowdy.The pageant began with an introduction of the contestants in casual dress: Derel Young, Jeremy Porter, Marvin Gorman and Desmond Kemp. The guys had to display their Aggie Pride by performing a section just to show how strongly they felt about their school, followed by a talent portion, a business wear and an impromptu session.For talent, Young performed poetry, spitting out verses with his raspy tone that instantly made him a crowd favorite.Porter serenaded his mother to tears while he sang to her.Gorman did a drill practice displaying his talent of rifle tossing. Finally, Kemp performed a dance that none of us soon will forget, displaying tremendous acrobatics.After the talent portion of the show an impromptu session displayed just how much Aggie Pride these four young men had. It seemed by this point the crowd was leaning toward contestants one or two. When asked what he would do if he were to become Mr. Aggie, Contestant number 1 (Young) said, “I would bring back Aggie Pride and I would also bring forth honesty with the position of Mr. Aggie.”Contestant 2 (Porter) was asked what Aggie pride means to him? Porter answered by saying “Aggie Pride means showing dignity to your school and for your school.” This response made the crowd seem to pull in his favor a bit more.After the impromptu the men took a short break while judges, that included statisticians and special guests Mr. Aggie ’87-’88, along with SUAB Executive Board members made their decisions. While they talked, the crowd witnessed a performance by Verge modeling troupe that got them on their toes. Verge displayed an exciting rock star theme.After the Verge performance, former Mr. Aggie 2001-2002 said farewell and the new Mr. Aggie, Derel Young, took home the crown for Mr. Aggie 2002-2003.Young thanked God and all his fellow Aggies for supporting him.Many people seemed to have enjoyed the pageant while others thought that it could have used a bit more organization.”I think that Verge was the best performance I saw for the evening. The actual pageant was boring and needed more contestants,” said junior political science major Natasha Mayberry.Junior accounting major Laqueita Scott shared in the disappointment. “It looked like it was missing something but I enjoyed the gospel singing,” Scott said.Some students said the show displayed a sense of pride for A&T. “It made me love my school even more and I had a great time,” psychology major Brandy Taylor said.

Uncategorized

Stamps honor women

Pioneering female journalists were commemorated Thursday, Sept. 26, at the Women in Journalism Stamp Ceremony held in N.C. A&T’s Stallings Ballroom.On the stamps, which were released Sept. 14, Nellie Bly, Marguerite Higgins, Ethel L. Payne and Ida M. Tarbell were recognized for their efforts to succeed in their field. Bly was known for her dangerous and outrageous stunts in order to get the story, and was one of the first stunt reporters. Higgins covered World War II, Vietnam and Korea. Her war correspondence paved the way for more women to enter this type of journalism.Payne was known as the “first lady of the black press.” She was the first African American female to be employed by a national network, and was also known for being an aggressive journalist who asked difficult questions. Tarbell also produced action with her articles on the Standard Oil Co. and John D. Rockefeller. In result, legal actions led to the breakup of the company.News anchor Neill McNeill, from WGHP Fox 8 presided over the program and news anchor Sandra Hughes, of WFMY News 2, was the guest speaker. Hughes was a prime example of a continuing legacy with journalism and women. She has 30 years of journalism under her belt, obtaining many awards such as an Edward R. Murrow award, a Gannett Broadcasting Award and an Outstanding News Service award from The Associated Press. She is also currently on the cover of American Woman magazine.Hughes spoke on her experiences and hardships with journalism and the trouble that came along with being a black female in that career field. Hughes also spoke about her arrival at WFMY News 2. She was one of the few women to be employed at the station, but despite her differences in race and gender, she was the first African-American female to have her own talk show, “Sandra and Friends,” in the Piedmont. The mother of two pointed out that the show often received bomb threats but she refused to get off the air. Her persistence and courage reflected the hardships of the four journalists who were commemorated in the unveiling. Hughes also added that journalism came with “responsibility, but it’s not a job, it’s a lifestyle, a passion.”

Uncategorized