Roush welcomes minorities to his stable

MARTINSVILLE, Va. – Jack Roush, owner of six Nextel Cup teams, took time to speak with Darrick Ignasiak about the Drive for Diversity before qualifying on Oct. 20. Roush has a Hispanic driver, Michel Jourdain, in the Craftsman Truck series. In 1988, Roush picked up Mark Martin to form a Cup team and won his first Cup championship with Matt Kenseth in 2003.

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Greek Show

On Friday, Oct. 20, A&T held it’s 80th Step Show hosted by the well-known alumnus Terrence Jenkins from 106 & Park with co-host Travis.

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Letter to the editor

To the Editor,I am writing in response to A&T Register Copy Desk Chief Joshua Capers’ September 27 column, “Are We Really Safe?” In it Capers discussed the all too familiar subject of fear ?” in particular the American public’s seemingly constant fear of another 9/11. Capers specifically cited a report about a man named Adnan El-Shukrijumah, who the report said would “serve as the field commander for the next terrorist attack on U.S. soil.” More disturbingly, Capers went on to say that “the FBI . . . reported that in 2004 . . . El-Shukrijumah was last seen in Mexico, where he hijacked a plane so he could transport a nuclear weapon and nuclear equipment to the U.S.” Needless to say, this statement certainly caught my attention! As someone who follows the news closely, I was quite surprised to learn from Mr. Capers that I had somehow missed that FBI report about a hijacked Mexican airliner filled with nuclear weapons and piloted by a known Al-Qaeda terrorist that disappeared into the United States two years ago. I decided to investigate the matter further.I started with Capers’ only cited source for his story, a website called World Net Daily. I had never visited the site before . . . and now I know why. On the day I looked at World Net Daily it featured, among other things, an exclusive commentary titled, “Feminists: Morally Equivalent to School Shooter” (a disturbing reference to the man who recently killed several Amish girls in Pennsylvania). Other articles and editorials followed in a similarly twisted, fanatical Right-Wing vein. The advertisements on the site were also telling: a “Nukalert” keychain (“personal radiation monitor and alarm,” presumably useful for finding El-Shukrijumah’s missing nuke-laden plane) and several books on the persecution of American Christians and the evils of Islam. In other words, World Net Daily is a clearinghouse for Christian-Right paranoia. If Capers had bothered to do his homework, this would have been obvious to him and he might have considered double-checking his story, as I did.One or two Google searches later, Capers’ error was exposed. The FBI never reported the story about the Mexican hijacking, as Capers claimed; rather, that story appears to have come from one of the many crackpot bloggers who feed “information” to websites like World Net Daily. It is true that El-Shukrijumah is on the FBI’s most wanted list for his suspected involvement with Al-Qaeda, but the FBI’s website makes no mention of the other parts of Capers’ claims. The truth is the FBI does not know where he is (not exactly a reassuring thought).Why is any of this important for the A&T community? I can think of two main reasons. First, students need to know-and Capers, as an aspiring journalist, really ought to know-that all sources of information are not equal. Some are more reliable than others. And isn’t there a rule in journalism that says you cannot run a story without at least two corroborating sources? Second, and even more important, citizens in a republic need to possess critical thinking skills in order for democracy to function. A free press is essential to democracy, and there can be no freedom without serious, critical questioning of all truths. Stirring up unfounded fears, as Capers’ column did, produces the opposite effect and only plays into the hands of those who want to silence such criticism. In closing, allow me to suggest a title for a different A&T Register editorial: Are We Really Safe from Bad Journalism?Sincerely,Dr. James WoodAssociate ProfessorDepartment of HistoryNorth Carolina A&T StateUniversity(The article referenced to in this letter: Are we really safe?)

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Two A&T students become global scholars

“From the classroom window you can see the beach and when you walk outside you’re in the Caribbean,” said Brandon Fennell. Fennell, a junior finance major, and Justin Hayden, a senior electronics computer technology major, were both chosen to attend The Summer Institute for Future Global Leaders at The University of the Virgin Islands at St. Thomas.

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“To hell and back” in one lecture:

This past Monday started like any other school day for me. It was the Monday after homecoming and I assumed that it would be a very average day, considering that all of the excitement and action on campus took place on last week. But boy was I wrong. At the end of the day, I got all of the action that I needed to last me for the rest of this semester and then some. The funniest thing about the entire situation was that all of the action occurred in the place where I felt that it would be the least likely to happen…in the classroom.The problem all started a couple of weeks ago when our teacher assigned a group assignments that the class had about a week and a half to complete. On the day that it was due, many of the students did not show up to class on time because they were finishing up their assignments at the last minute. When the professor arrived to class and found that only a handful of students were there, he promptly cancelled the class and left.The next day that class resumed, many students noticed a change in the attitude of the professor. For one, he started giving out daily quizzes, which he did not inform students of, which made the already-upset class angrier.But the breaking point to all of the semester-long frustrations between the students and professor occurred this past Monday when the class literally “went to hell and back.”On Monday, we once again started class with a quiz as usual, but as class proceeded, something did catch me by surprise. I noticed that a lot of students had gone up to talk to the professor about grades. At that exact moment, a friend of mine in the class sent me a text message asking what my grade was. I was curious as to why he was asking me this. Last I knew, I had an A average, but boy was I surprised, it had dropped three letters.I came to find out that the majority of the students in our class had received some less than impressive mid-term grades. After we had turned our quiz in, the free-for-all began.The professor complained that he had to start giving us daily quizzes because he felt that the students had become too lazy and only treated the class as an easy elective.Of course, that statement angered many of the students and only added more fuel to the fire.He then began to accuse that the majority of class of acting like high school students and admitted that the class had become a job for him to come to and teach on a daily basis.By this point, students were making any and all kinds of excuses to justify their behavior and performance in the class. Then the next few minutes were like one big blur. To be blunt, there was a lot of cursing, a lot of yelling and a lot of other things that should never be said in a classroom setting.The professor started telling the class that we needed to get on our stuff and before anyone knew it, two females in class started to argue over the points that the teacher was making. It got so bad that the teacher and other students had to verbally calm them down before any real violence ensued, and to cap everything off, our teacher finally dismissed the class but not before making a few more controversial statements.You may ask what is the point of this story? Is it to make the professor look bad?No. If I wanted him to look bad, then I could have easily mentioned his name, but I have way too much respect for him to do something like that. This article was also not writtento vent out any frustrations. For one, I am not one of the students that he was addressing.I come to class everyday and do my work and am always attentive, and I am not the only one. For every student that misbehaves and acts like a disrespectful jerk in class, there are just as many who show up and do what they are supposed to do.This story is being written to remind the professor that even though what he did may have seemed a bit (OK, a lot) unprofessional, he had every right to say how he felt. If he wants to give us a quiz everyday for the rest of the semester, then that is OK.At the end of the day, it is his class and he has the right to do what he wants.Students need to remember that even though we are in college, there are still basic rules that we must abide by. If a teacher is giving a lecture or addressing the class in general, then you should not be talking, period. If you have a question to ask then you raise your hand. If there is something that you do not agree with, then you should take it up with the teacher after class, in a civilized manner.I regret that any of the events that transpired this past Monday ever happened inthe first place.Things should have never gotten to the point where a respected professor, especially one that holds a Ph. D., should have had to react in that manner.At the same time, it is a shame that the majority of the students that were showing disrespect in class on that day will probably come back having not learned anything from their actions on that day. And that is the real shame of what went on in class on that memorable day.

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