Living with Roommates Who Smoke Weed

Jane Doe – Contributor:

It was the end of the semester. My current roommates were getting ready to move out of the apartment, and I had just received the contact information of my three new roommates that would move in at the end of the summer.

Editor’s Note: The name of the writer has been changed to protect the writer’s identity and that of those mentioned.

I was excited. For me, this meant a fresh start. It had been a very rough year living with the other roommates. Cleanliness was something that they struggled with, and I couldn’t be happier to receive new roommates with the hope that they would be cleaner.

As we began texting each other through GroupMe, we began to get to know each other, asking questions about our living preferences.

I began to feel comfortable about the idea of these three new girls moving in to my shared living space. They seemed relatively quiet, respectful, and clean.

We covered every standard question that you ask your roommates in GroupMe. We came to the point where the only thing left was to ask if they smoked.

I sent the question to the girls, anxiously awaiting a reply. The result? Two of the three girls moving in smoked.

Besides a dirty house, I cannot stand to come home and smell any type of smoke. Not that I have anything against people who smoke, but doing it in a place where I eat, sleep, and breathe, I have a problem with.

But what could I do? I had to deal with it. I couldn’t be the sour roommate and tell them that they couldn’t smoke. I had to compromise. After all, we were sharing this apartment, and all of us were paying rent.

A few weeks after my new roommates moved in, I began to come home, greeted by the stale smell of weed.

At first it didn’t bother me. But then the smell began to get in my room and my bathroom, and that’s when the problem evolved.

I brought the issue to my roommates. And to my surprise, they didn’t see how they were wrong. All I wanted was for them to try to cover up the smell of the smoke in the apartment.

Anytime you have a house with four girls from different backgrounds, there are bound to be problems, but the key to a happy home is compromise.

The girls and I ended up working out the problem. They learned to cover it up and be considerate.

I am thankful for the experience of living in a diverse house. It has taught me personal problem solving skills, as well as how to cooperate within a small group of people.

I know that’s not the case for others. Weed smokers: be considerate of your roommates. It is the worst feeling to come home and not feel comfortable in a place that you live. It may seem like us non-smokers are trying to kill your vibe, but in all honesty, we just want to be relaxed and comfortable as well.